Taiji Shibashi (十八) Instructors course

Taiji Shibashi Instructors course 7th & 8th March 2015

The Taiji Qigong Shibashi (十八) Instructor course is designed to provide Qigong instructors with all the tools and information needed to teach the Shibashi as true Qigong.

The Shibashi (also known as the Eighteen Postures of Taiji Qigong) is a set of Qigong exercises based on Taiji that adheres to the rules governing Taiji stances (in particular, the Wuji stance). These stances are fundamentally important if the practitioner wishes to get the most out of the Qigong.

Since the early 1980′s, when the Shibashi was introduced, in, the significance of the Taiji stances has been lost and their true use as Qigong has been diminished and the beneficial qualities have depleted.  Without a solid base (root) there is a conflict of focus and the cognitive mind (Yi) cannot be fully focused on guiding the Qi.  This being the case, during the course a lot of time is spent on attaining and recognizing proper posture.

Syllabus

  • Dao-yin exercises
  • Learning stances
  • Learning the Shibashi exercises
  • Applying 5 Elements Theory within the Shibashi
  • Modifications that can alter the Primary Meridian Pair for specific exercises
  • Alternate breathing
  • Modifications for seated Shibashi
  • Listening Jing

This course is suitable for: –

  • Taiji practitioners
  • Qigong practitioners
  • Reiki practitioners
  • Shiatsu practitioners
  • All All Energy Work practitioners

Next course: –

Dates: 7th & 8th March 2015
Times: 10:00 till 17:00
Location: East Kilbride, Lanarkshire
Cost: £140.00
A deposit of £30.00 is required, with the balance to be paid on the first day of the course. As spaces are limited, advanced booking is essential.

 

Booking can be made via PayPal at Pro-Holistic.co.uk.

 

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Taiji Shibashi Qigong Workshop

Taiji Shibashi Qigong Workshop 14th February 2015

The Tai Chi Chi Kung Shibashi (十八), or the eighteen postures of Tai Chi Chi Kung, is a set of Chi Kung exercises that utilise Tai Chi stances and adhere to the rules governing them. Although this set was brought together in the 1980’s the individual exercises themselves date back centuries, even millenia.

The Shibashi Chi Kung focus on health and well-being, directing and promoting the flow of chi through the meridians. Although each of them can be practiced individually, or in any variation, the set flows beautifully, from one posture to the next,producing a feeling of inner calmness and wellbeing.

The health benefits from the Shibashi become clear when they are practiced regularly and, in effect, you are being proactive with your health and wellbeing. The Shibashi are easy to learn and can easily be practiced in a restricted space where the Tai Chi forms would be impossible.

Feedback from previous workshops

  • Did the workshop meet your expectations? – 100% Yes.
  • Did the workshop cover the syllabus? – 100% Yes.
  • Were the methods taught useful? – 100% Yes.
  • Would you recommend this workshop? – 100% Yes.
  • Is there anything you would like to see added to the syllabus? “Perhaps guidlines about how best to practice with a view to building confidence to teach others” *This is included in the Instructor Course.

“Really enjoyed this workshop – couldn’t have been better, fantastic day and I feel like I learned an enormous amount and had fun doing it!”
“I really liked that the meridians were mentioned within the exercises and found this useful.”
“I felt very well lead throughout the exercises and supported – thought it was a great course.”

 

One example of the health benefits related to the practice of the Shibashi is: –

PUSHING TO THE DIAGONALS:

This is effective for alleviating arthritis of the shoulder or knee, muscular fatigue of the groin (psoas, etc.), asthma and bronchitis.

 

The Shibashi Chi Kung course is suitable for everyone including: –

  • Beginners
  • Tai Chi practitioners
  • Chi Kung practitioners
  • Reiki practitioners
  • Shiatsu practitioners
  • Physiotherapists
  • Rehabilitation therapists
  • Exercise instructors
  • Group leaders

This course, which can be used towards our certificated Shibashi Instructor course, provides a firm grounding in the Tai Chi Shibashi Chi Kung system.

Course syllabus:-

  • Dao-yin exercises
  • Stances
  • Shibashi exercises

Typical timetabe: -

10:00 – Introduction
10:10 – Dao Yin
10:20 – Shibashi (exercises 1 to 6). Stances, posture & movement
11:30 – Break
11:45 – Shibashi (exercises 7 to 12). Stances, posture & movement
13:00 – Lunch
14:00 – Shibashi (exercises 13 to 18). Stances, posture & movement
15:15 – Break
15:25 – Shibashi entire set. Listening Jing – experiencing the quality of the qi.
16:30 – Question time

The course instructor, Des Lawton MRSS is a Tai Chi and Chi Kung teacher who has been a practicing martial artist for over 35 years, he is a fully qualified Shiatsu Therapist (a Member of the Register Of the Shiatsu Society) and practitioner of Healing Chi Kung. Des has been teaching the Tai Chi Shibashi Chi Kung since 1989. Through daily practice, and with the in depth knowledge of the meridian system and Five Element Theory that he attained while studying Shiatsu and Healing Chi Kung, Des has achieved a profound understanding of the Tai Chi Shibashi.

Course information: -

Dates: 14th February 2015
Times: 10:00 till 17:00
Location: East Kilbride, Lanarkshire
Cost: £60.00
A deposit of £20.00 is required, with the balance to be paid on the first day of the course. Advanced booking is essential.
Booking on Pro-Holistic Taiji Shibashi Course

Further details of courses on Pro-Holistic Courses

This course is being provided by San Bao Martial Arts

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Can Crystal Healing Help

Can Crystal Healing Help?

crystal healing - crystals

Crystal healing is the placement of crystals over the chakras and subtle energy centres of the body. During treatment, the practitioner will choose what crystals they deem best suited for the client utilising its energy healing qualities for their specific needs. Crystal healing has the ability to clear and remove energy blocks within the aura that cause physical and emotional distress, helping to deal with past trauma, phobias, addictions, etc.

According to practitioners of Crystal Therapy, each Crystal has its own healing qualities and although they can be used individually it is more common for a combination of crystals to be used. Some examples of the healing qualities are: –

Carnelian: 2nd chakra. Helps asthma, and blood pressure. And affects the circulatory system, kidneys, stimulate appetite, emotions, sexuality, physical energy, celebration, reproductive system, menstrual cramps, arthritis, kidneys, gall bladder, pancreas. Confidence, assertiveness, drive, Balance creativity and mental processes.

Emerald: 4th to 7th chakra. Lifts depression and relieves insomnia. Has a tranquillising effect on the heart (emotions). Respiratory system, heart, lymph nodes, blood, thymus, balance blood sugar, childbirth, eyesight. Strengthen heart chakra for growth, peace, harmony, patience, love, and honesty.

Sourced from
Pro-Holistic.co.uk

 

Therapist info

Crystal healing - crystals

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Crystal Healing Scotland

Crystal Paths

 

Resources

Further information on Crystal Therapy including case studies, etc.

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Please note that Holistic-Pages.com makes no guarantee regarding the validity, efficacy, or safety of any therapy and we advise that medical advice should be sought from a qualified medical practitioner regarding any illness.
Holistic-Pages.com is not responsible for the credentials, qualifications and insurance status of any of the therapists who have links from this site and we advise that these should be checked before any treatment is undertaken.

 

 

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Applied Kinesiology, Dr George Goodheart

Applied Kinesiology

Please note that the information given refers to Applied Kinesiology as developed by the American chiropractor, Dr George Goodheart, in 1964, and not Kinesiology, the study of the mechanics and anatomy in relation to human movement.

Applied Kinesiology - muscle testingPronounced kin-easy-ology, there are many different branches but they all utilise the same basic tool…………muscle testing. Muscle testing is a painless procedure that involves the practitioner applying gentle pressure to specific parts of the body, testing the response of the underlying muscle. The particular part of the body being tested is specifically positioned, in order to isolate the muscle (as far as possible) being tested. The muscle will either give way, at least slightly, or it will easily be able to resist the pressure from the practitioner. The resulting responses are used by the Kinesiologist as a means of diagnosis, to gain information and to decide what course of action what is required.

Kinesiology can help deal with a broad spectrum of complaints including emotional problems, educational problems, structural problems (posture), etc.

During a course off treatment, the practitioner will take a case history, then they will advise you how to position the particular muscle or muscles they want to test, also advising how much effort is necessary in resisting the pressure that is applied to the particular muscle. The practitioner may rub, tap or hold points on the body. They may use magnets, homeopathic remedies, or flower remedies and, occasionally use tuning forks, colour, or sound. The choice of treatment is totally determined by the muscle testing and no two treatments are alike as that treatment is for the person and not the condition………. Two people may have the same condition but they, themselves, are different so the course of treatment will be different.

Verbal muscle testing (not used by all Kinesiologists) is when the muscle testing response is sought by verbally asking questions: with a locked response of the arm indicating yes and an unlocked/spongy response indicating no. The practitioner will then systematically question, while muscle testing, in order to establish what treatment course is required. Verbal questioning can also be used alongside muscle testing.

Many other therapists have incorporated Kinesiology techniques into their diagnosis/treatment plans. These include, Chiropractors, Bowen therapists, Homeopaths and Aromatherapists.

 

Therapist info

Applied Kinesiology - muscle testing

 

 

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Shelagh Cumming BSc KFAssoc

Minna Oldfield

 

 

Resources

Further information on Applied Kinesiology including case studies, etc.

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Please note that Holistic-Pages.com makes no guarantee regarding the validity, efficacy, or safety of any therapy and we advise that medical advice should be sought from a qualified medical practitioner regarding any illness.
Holistic-Pages.com is not responsible for the credentials, qualifications and insurance status of any of the therapists who have links from this site and we advise that these should be checked before any treatment is undertaken.

 

 

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Thai Massage and the Prana Nadis

Thai Massage

Thai massage stretch for the triceps muscle.

It is thought that Thai massage has its earliest roots in India and has been a healing therapy for millennia.

Theoretically, Thai massage is based on the concept of meridian system (energy lines) called Prana Nadis. The influence of its Indian origin lies in Yoga philosophy and the movements and stretches of Thai massage clearly have Yoga roots. The philosophy of Yoga states that life energy (Prana, Qi, Chi, Ki) is absorbed from the air we breathe and the food we eat and that we are supplied with this vital energy along this network of energy lines (also known as the meridian system in Traditional Chinese Medicine).

Any disturbances in the flow of energy result in an insufficient supply of Prana, which can in turn leads to illness and disease. By stimulating these energy lines with massage, Thai massage can release any blockages, facilitate the free flow of Prana, and help to restore general health and wellbeing. Thai massage mainly uses ten meridians and the important acupressure points that lie on them. By massaging these meridians and points it is possible to treat a wide range of diseases and to relieve pain.

Contrary to Western style massage, traditional Thai massage concentrates on the flow of Prana and any work with the physical body is secondary. Effleurage, which dominates in Western massage, is absent from Thai massage where the emphasis is on the energy points (acupuncture points) and these are pressed, or general pressure is used. Thai massage utilises a lot of stretching and many of these resemble Yoga stretches and postures and are sometimes described as ‘applied Hatha Yoga’.

In India and Thailand, massage was always considered to be a spiritual practice closely connected with the teachings of the Buddha. Until fairly recently, it was mainly in the Buddhist temple where massage was taught and practiced. Even today one of the most important massage schools in Thailand is at the Wat Po monastery in Bangkok.

A truly good Thai masseur performs his art in a meditative mood (Chen/Zen state) while working with full awareness, mindfulness and focus, “listening” to the feedback from the Prana lines and energy flow.

Thai massage is usually done on a futon mat on the hard floor whilst wearing loose and comfortable clothing.

 

Some common ailments that Thai Massage can help with are:

  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)
  • Insomnia
  • Low energy
  • The effects of stress
  • Fatigue
  • Back pain
  • Tension
  • Stress

 

Therapist info

Thai massage stretch for the trapezius and levator scaulae muscles.

 

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Edinburgh Prana Lotus

Thai Massage in West Midlands

 

 

Resources

Further information on Thai Massage including case studies, etc.

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Please note that Holistic-Pages.com makes no guarantee regarding the validity, efficacy, or safety of any therapy and we advise that medical advice should be sought from a qualified medical practitioner regarding any illness.
Holistic-Pages.com is not responsible for the credentials, qualifications and insurance status of any of the therapists who have links from this site and we advise that these should be checked before any treatment is undertaken.

 

 

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Taiji, the calm within the storm

Taiji

Taiji benefits all ages. You are never too young, or too old, to learn.

Originating in ancient China, Taiji (also written as Taiji Quan, Tai Chi, Tai Chi Chuan) has gained enormous popularity throughout the world as its health benefits have become more recognised.

Taiji, as practiced in the west today, is a usually seen as a slow, choreographed, set of posture that is used for exercise, relaxation and health. It can perhaps best be thought of as a moving meditation.

There are a number of different styles (family styles such as Chen, Yang, Li, Wu & Sun as well as the more recently formalised Beijing styles) and within these styles there are various forms which consist of a sequence of movements and postures. Originally developed as a martial art, each of these movements was formulated with self-defence in mind.

Taiji has its origins in Taoism and Taoist martial arts. The literal translation of Taiji Quan is “Supreme Ultimate Boxing.” This is not a big-headed, boastful, claim to be the supreme martial art as the term “Supreme Ultimate” refers to the Tao. The symbol that is usually referred to as the Yin/Yang symbol is actually called Taiji and it represents the duality of our perception of Tao, of which the universe is only part. Taiji, in this context, can be seen as a microcosm of the Tao (universe) as its movements, shapes and breathing patterns reflect dynamic forces and interactions of the universe.

The concept of Qi is a fundamental part of Chinese medicine and philosophy. Qi is the intrinsic energy that the universe is made of, and it is also the energy that animates the body. The movements of Taiji promote the circulation of Qi within the body creating health and vitality. The Qi circulates through pathways that are known as meridians and the meridian contain the access points that are used by acupuncture, shiatsu, tuina, etc. for their healing properties and by martial arts for their harming properties.

Using these principals, Taiji Quan is a sophisticated method of combat where the Taiji Quan practitioner aims to neutralize his opponent’s use of force (strength – Li) before “borrowing it” and applying a countering force (focus – Jing) of his own. This is the interplay of Yang and Yin.

To the uninformed, it is hard to see how these slow, graceful and fluid movements could be used for defence against someone who is attacking with speed and strength. In any confrontation, the Taiji practitioner will also move faster………… with a speed to match his attacker’s but with the same fluid, relaxed and rooted movement that has been practiced in the form. It is by practicing at a slow pace that perfection in balance, rooting and technique can be gained.

However, for the vast majority of Taiji players, the martial aspect is never really touched on and the emphasis is on the tranquillity of mind and body, along with all the health benefits, that Taiji provides.

Taiji fosters calmness and tranquillity of mind as the focus of the practitioner is solely on the precise execution of the forms. The precision that is required within the postures also helps correct poor postural alignment that can contribute to tension, excess pressure on joints, or injury.

Today we may use Taiji to rid ourselves of the fatigue that stress, overwork, poor posture and the lack of atunement with our own body can bring. It is aid that Taiji increases longevity…………. This is something that modern scientific research is starting to agree with. This longevity does not mean that you will live forever. What it does mean is that daily practice promotes a healthy body, clarity of mind, better balance, denser bones, better circulation, more balanced blood pressure, lower (more efficient) respiration, and a more efficient and active lymphatic system (assisting the immune system. The list goes on! One more thing that Taiji can do for you is that you smile more……… Great big smiles, that
come from deep within.

 

In the words of Aldous Huxley (from Island):

“No leaps, no high kicks, no running. The feet always firmly on the ground…movements intrinsically beautiful and at the same time charged with symbolic meaning. Thought taking shape in ritual and stylized gesture. The whole body transformed into a hieroglyph, a succession of hieroglyphs, of attitudes modulating from significance to significance, like a poem or a piece of music. Movements of the muscles representing movements of the consciousness…It’s meditation in action; the metaphysics of the Mahayana expressed not in words, but through symbolic movements and gestures.”

 

Therapist info

Taiji has great health benefits.

 

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Taiji, Taiji Quan & Neijia, Lanarkshire

San Bao Martial Arts School, Lanarkshire

T’ai-Chi London

 

 

Resources

Further information on Taiji including case studies, etc.

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Please note that Holistic-Pages.com makes no guarantee regarding the validity, efficacy, or safety of any therapy and we advise that medical advice should be sought from a qualified medical practitioner regarding any illness.
Holistic-Pages.com is not responsible for the credentials, qualifications and insurance status of any of the therapists who have links from this site and we advise that these should be checked before any treatment is undertaken.

 

 

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Feldenkrais Method – Moshé Feldenkrais (1904–1984)

Feldenkrais Method

Feldenkrais method at work

Developed by Moshé Feldenkrais, DSc (1904–1984), the Feldenkrais Method is a somatic educational system that aims to improve the range of movement, aiming to expand and refine the use of the self through awareness (propreoception), in order to reduce any limitations in movement (including any resultant pain), promoting general well-being. Usually regarded as a complementary medicine practice, although in Sweden it is practised within the general healthcare system.

Moshe Feldenkrais was a distinguished scientist and engineer whose career included work at the Curie Institute in Paris in the 1930’s. He believed that good health is founded on good function and asserted that his method of body/mind exploration improved health by making individuals more aware of their minds and bodies: “What I am after is more flexible minds, not just more flexible bodies”.

This is a method that employs self-awareness, experiential self-education and movement…………. Self-movement rather than movement through manipulation. His background as a physicist and engineer was augmented by his love of the martial
arts (Judo & Ju Jitsu) went a long way towards his pioneering work.

There have been several scientific studies carried out to investigate the effect of Feldenkrais treatments. One of these, in 1999, used a randomized controlled trial to investigate whether Feldenkrais or physiotherapy would reduce complaints from neck pain, shoulder pain and disability. There were three groups and the participants were randomly assigned to 1) the Feldenkrais program, 2) physiotherapy treatment, or 3) a control group. The Feldenkrais and physiotherapy groups were given over 16 weeks of paid work. The Feldenkrais group showed a significant decrease in complaints from neck and shoulders and in disability during leisure time. The Physiotherapy group showed no change in complaints and the Control group showed a worsening.

Benefits:

  • Greater relaxation and well-being.
  • Relief from tension and muscular pain.
  • Easier and fuller breathing.
  • Increased vitality.
  • Improved performance.
  • Greater ease in everyday activities.

therapist info

Feldenkrais method - aligning posture
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Scott Clark, London

Jackie Adkins, Forres

 

 

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Please note that Holistic-Pages.com makes no guarantee regarding the validity, efficacy, or safety of any therapy and we advise that medical advice should be sought from a qualified medical practitioner regarding any illness.
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Craniosacral Therapy Info

Craniosacral Therapy Info

Craniosacral Therapy - back treatment

Craniosacral therapy is a gentle, hands-on healing technique, which does not involve manipulation. It is a new technique based on the work done by Dr. John E. Upledger who, in the 1980’s, discovered the CranioSacral System. Dr. Upledger is now recognised as a world-renowned authority on CranioSacral Therapy. It works directly with the body’s physiological, energetic and psycho-emotional systems and offers the opportunity of improved quality of life.

During treatment, the therapist gently mobilises and releases the craniosacral system (the soft tissue of the cranium and the spine down). It focuses on the cerebrospinal fluid, which surrounds the brain and the spinal cord, dealing with any irregularities in the flow of this fluid. The therapist listens, via the hands, to what is going on in your body, identifying any irregularities in the flow and helping to relieve any pain and tension held there.

The movement of the cerebrospinal fluid is believed to create a vital body rhythm that is important for health and well-being and it is thought that this therapy may be beneficial in treating many issues, including hyperactivity, cerebral palsy, dyslexia and stress related problems.

The craniosacral system is made up of membranes and spinal fluid that enclose and protect the brain and spinal cord. The cerebrospinal fluid is constantly circulating, moving rhythmically, and Craniosacral Practitioners learn how to monitor this movement/rhythm with their. Just as doctors are able to make certain inferences from cardiovascular and respiratory systems (heart or breathing rhythms) we can now gather information about the condition and function of the craniosacral rhythm within the body. The vibrancy and flow of this system is extremely important as the velocity and amplitude represents the
health of the system, reflecting the health of the nervous system.

Treatment usually takes place a quiet, private setting with clients remaining fully clothed. The session (typically lasting approximately one hour) is performed with the client reclining on a treatment table while the practitioner stands or sits, positioned at various times throughout the session at the client’s head, torso or feet.

Craniosacral Therapy helps to boost general well-being, improve quality of sleep, increase energy and reduce stress. It is non-intrusive and works with the entire structure, physiology, mind and spirit.

 

Therapist info

Craniosacral therapy - neck treatment

 

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The Haven, Ashburton

Dulwich Therapy Rooms

 

 

Resources

Further information on Craniosacral Therapy including case studies, etc.

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Please note that Holistic-Pages.com makes no guarantee regarding the validity, efficacy, or safety of any therapy and we advise that medical advice should be sought from a qualified medical practitioner regarding any illness.
Holistic-Pages.com is not responsible for the credentials, qualifications and insurance status of any of the therapists who have links from this site and we advise that these should be checked before any treatment is undertaken.

 

 

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Reiki of Dr Mikao Usui

Reiki

Reiki in action, ki transmition over the head.

The word reiki derives from the Japanese word reiki (meaning “mysterious atmosphere”), which was originally derive from the Chinese word língqì (“supernatural influence”). However, Reiki practitioners prefer to use “Universal Life Energy” as its translation.

Reiki is a system of natural healing which evolved in Japan from the experience and dedication of Dr Mikao Usui (d. 1926). Dr Usui, a Japanese doctor, developed or rediscovered Reiki towards the end of the 19th century while studying ancient Buddhist texts. He was inspired to develop this healing system from those teachings, spending many years of his life in study, research and meditation. Once Reiki was complete, he spent the rest of his life in the practising and teaching the system.

There are two main branches of Reiki, usually referred to as Traditional Japanese Reiki and Western Reiki. The main difference between them is that Westernised forms tend to use systematised hand-placements while the Japanese Reiki branches tend to have a more intuitive approach. Reiki has a three-tiered hierarchy of degrees, usually referred to as the First, Second, and Master/Teacher level, all of which are associated with different skills and techniques.

Reiki was introduced to the United States, in the 1970’s, by Hawaio Takata, a Japanese woman living in Hawaii. Takata having learned it from one of Usui’s pupils, Dr Chujiro Hayashi.

The Usui system of Reiki is a simple technique, using hands-on healing and sacred symbols that have been used for healing purposes for thousands of years. In using  Reiki techniques, the vitalizing, intrinsic force of Universal Life energy is channelled from the universe and transferred, through the hands, to various energy centres in the receiver’s body.

Reiki is said to intensify vibration of body molecules so that blockages that may cause disharmony and disease are released. It helps with all kinds of physical, mental, emotional or spiritual issues as Ki energy permeates the physical, mental, emotional, and several spiritual bodies and is fundamental to their development.

Reiki is a spiritual path (not a religion) as well as a form of healing that enhances the wellbeing of both the receiver and the giver.

During a Reiki session, the recipient remains clothed and usually lies on a couch and relaxes. The practitioner gently places their hands non-intrusively in a sequence of positions which cover the whole body. Being a holistic system, it is the whole person that is treated rather than any specific symptoms. A full treatment usually takes 1 to 1½ hours.

 

Therapist info

Reiki in action, ki transmition to the back.

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Carol Gough, Cardiff

Anita Levie, Stoke-on-Trent

Reiki South London

 

 

Resources

Further information on Reiki including case studies, etc.

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Please note that Holistic-Pages.com makes no guarantee regarding the validity, efficacy, or safety of any therapy and we advise that medical advice should be sought from a qualified medical practitioner regarding any illness.
Holistic-Pages.com is not responsible for the credentials, qualifications and insurance status of any of the therapists who have links from this site and we advise that these should be checked before any treatment is undertaken.

 

 

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Qigong Basics, getting the most from Qigong

Qigong Basics

Qigong Basics - Qigong for health being practiced at sunset.

Qigong (pronounced Chi-Kung) is an ancient Chinese art for the promotion of health and, when written in Chinese, the word Qigong is comprised of two characters: Qi (anima, vital energy) and Gong (work, cultivation)…………… Qigong literally means energy work, or energy cultivation.  Before this work can be carried out effectively, the Qigong basics must be understood.

There are four main divisions of Qigong, and two methods.

Firstly, let us deal with the divisions of Qigong

  • Spiritual
  • Medical
  • Martial
  • Athletic

The choice of which method that is used is dependent on the goal of the practitioner. However, there is some overlap between the each of the methods.

 

Secondly, the two methods

  • Active qigong – Where physical movement is used to help the practitioner to guide the Qi.
  • Passive Qigong – Where there is no physical movement and it is purely the Yi (cognitive mind) that is used to guide the Qi.

The division of Qigong that we are dealing with here is Medical Qigong. This is a branch of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and according to TCM, Qi is life energy and the health of the body is reliant upon smooth, harmonious, flow of Qi within the body and disease is the result of poor Qi circulation and through Qigong it is possible to balance the flow of Qi allowing the body to heal itself.

The Qi is the intrinsic energy, the life force that we share with the rest of the natural world. Qi also refers to energy in the largest sense, it is the stuff of the universe, it is both matter and energy and link that bonds them together. Qi transcends and is not bounded by time or space.

Qigong works by using specific postures and movements of the body whilst combining them with focus (using directed breath) and intention. Through the use of these exercises, the Qi can be cultivated and replenished.

As previously stated, in the precept of Traditional Chinese Medicine is that all diseases are a result of blockage in the meridians (energy channels), causing obstructions and sluggishness in the flow of Qi. A person is healthy only when the Qi freely circulates through the meridians, nourishing all vital organs and tissues. The “Yellow Emperor’s Canon of Internal Medicine” (circa 250BC) states: “When the Qi is blocked, there is sickness. No blockage – no sickness”.

Literally thousands of styles of Qi Gong exist so it is a matter of finding the one that is suitable for your needs. Some styles are designed for general health and wellbeing and require daily practice. Other styles/exercises have specific therapeutic qualities and have been developed to treat specific ailments.

Qi Gong can be practiced by just about anyone, whether they are young or old, active, sedentary, or disabled.

Although there are many styles, they are founded on similar principles

  • A relaxed, grounded posture
  • A straight, supple spine
  • Breathing that uses the diaphragm
  • Fluid movement
  • Tranquil awareness

The quality of the Qi Gong practice is far more important than how often the practice is undertaken. Any aerobic exercise can be slowed down to the point where it appears, superficially, to resemble Qigong but as there is no intent, no focus and no guidance of the Qi, it is NOT Qigong.

It is far more beneficial to concentrate one or two styles, learning through experiential awareness than to learn many exercises superficially. It is vitally important to find a good Qigong teacher who has experience of Qi rather than experience of books.

 

Qigong Teachers

Qigong Basics - Painting rainbows,qigong style.

 

If you wish your website to be included on this page please see our Resources Page for details.

 

 

Healing Qigong at Pro Holistic, Lanarkshire

San Bao Martial Arts School

 

Resources

Further information on Qigong including case studies, etc.

If you wish to add further resource information about Qigong please contact us with the details.us with the details.

 

Please note that Holistic-Pages.com makes no guarantee regarding the validity, efficacy, or safety of any therapy and we advise that medical advice should be sought from a qualified medical practitioner regarding any illness.
Holistic-Pages.com is not responsible for the credentials, qualifications and insurance status of any of the therapists who have links from this site and we advise that these should be checked before any treatment is undertaken.

 

 

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