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Physiotherapy, the Three Types

Physiotherapy

Physiotherapy can be used to treat sports injuries.

In Physiotherapy, a Physiotherapist assesses and diagnoses problems with human movement and function before planning and administering a treatment program in order to restore function or minimise any current dysfunction that is due to injury, illness, disease, or ageing. The physiotherapist will use a combination of manual therapy, movement training, electrotherapy (ultrasound, etc.) and prescribing exercise. In cases where patients are recovering from serious injury or disability, physiotherapy is a vital treatment that can mean the difference between dependence and independence.

Physiotherapy aims to rehabilitate and improve the lives of people with movement disorders by using evidence-based, natural methods such as exercise, motivation, adapted equipment, education and advocacy.

 

Generally, there are three different types of physiotherapy:

  • Musculoskeletal – treating issues with muscles, bones and joints. Common conditions treated under this banner include back pain, bursitis, strains, arthritis, workplace injuries and sports injuries.
  • Neurological – treating nervous system disorders including head injuries, stroke, spinal cord injuries, Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis. Also some rehabilitation after brain surgery.
  • Cardiothoracic – treating disorders of the cardio-respiratory system including asthma, chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Including the covering post thoracic surgery rehabilitation.

However, it is Muskuloskeletal Physiotherapy that we are focussing on. This is the healthcare professional who you may seek assistance of if you are suffering from any of the following:

  • Arthritis.
  • Back and neck pain.
  • Motor conditions such as cerebral palsy.
  • Pregnancy-related problems, such as back or hip pain.
  • Work-related issues, such as repetitive strain injury.
  • Breathing difficulties such as asthma.
  • Sports injuries

 

Physiotherapy uses a variety of tools to help regain movement and recover from injury:

  • Joint manipulation and mobilisation.
  • Massage.
  • Re-educating the muscles in order to correct faulty movement.
  • Exercise programs that are designed to improve mobility and strengthen muscles.
  • Breathing exercises.

 

Therapist info

Physiotherapy can be used to treat neck pain.

 

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Tim Edbrooke, Exeter

Response Mobile Physiotherapy, Dundee

 

 

Resources

Further information on Physiotherapy including case studies, etc.

If you wish to add further resource information about Physiotherapy please contact us with the details.

 

Please note that Holistic-Pages.com makes no guarantee regarding the validity, efficacy, or safety of any therapy and we advise that medical advice should be sought from a qualified medical practitioner regarding any illness.
Holistic-Pages.com is not responsible for the credentials, qualifications and insurance status of any of the therapists who have links from this site and we advise that these should be checked before any treatment is undertaken.

 

 

Applied Kinesiology, Dr George Goodheart

Applied Kinesiology

Please note that the information given refers to Applied Kinesiology as developed by the American chiropractor, Dr George Goodheart, in 1964, and not Kinesiology, the study of the mechanics and anatomy in relation to human movement.

Applied Kinesiology - muscle testingPronounced kin-easy-ology, there are many different branches but they all utilise the same basic tool…………muscle testing. Muscle testing is a painless procedure that involves the practitioner applying gentle pressure to specific parts of the body, testing the response of the underlying muscle. The particular part of the body being tested is specifically positioned, in order to isolate the muscle (as far as possible) being tested. The muscle will either give way, at least slightly, or it will easily be able to resist the pressure from the practitioner. The resulting responses are used by the Kinesiologist as a means of diagnosis, to gain information and to decide what course of action what is required.

Kinesiology can help deal with a broad spectrum of complaints including emotional problems, educational problems, structural problems (posture), etc.

During a course off treatment, the practitioner will take a case history, then they will advise you how to position the particular muscle or muscles they want to test, also advising how much effort is necessary in resisting the pressure that is applied to the particular muscle. The practitioner may rub, tap or hold points on the body. They may use magnets, homeopathic remedies, or flower remedies and, occasionally use tuning forks, colour, or sound. The choice of treatment is totally determined by the muscle testing and no two treatments are alike as that treatment is for the person and not the condition………. Two people may have the same condition but they, themselves, are different so the course of treatment will be different.

Verbal muscle testing (not used by all Kinesiologists) is when the muscle testing response is sought by verbally asking questions: with a locked response of the arm indicating yes and an unlocked/spongy response indicating no. The practitioner will then systematically question, while muscle testing, in order to establish what treatment course is required. Verbal questioning can also be used alongside muscle testing.

Many other therapists have incorporated Kinesiology techniques into their diagnosis/treatment plans. These include, Chiropractors, Bowen therapists, Homeopaths and Aromatherapists.

 

Therapist info

Applied Kinesiology - muscle testing

 

 

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Shelagh Cumming BSc KFAssoc

Minna Oldfield

 

 

Resources

Further information on Applied Kinesiology including case studies, etc.

If you wish to add further resource information about Applied Kinesiology please contact us with the details.

 

Please note that Holistic-Pages.com makes no guarantee regarding the validity, efficacy, or safety of any therapy and we advise that medical advice should be sought from a qualified medical practitioner regarding any illness.
Holistic-Pages.com is not responsible for the credentials, qualifications and insurance status of any of the therapists who have links from this site and we advise that these should be checked before any treatment is undertaken.

 

 

Thai Massage and the Prana Nadis

Thai Massage

Thai massage stretch for the triceps muscle.

It is thought that Thai massage has its earliest roots in India and has been a healing therapy for millennia.

Theoretically, Thai massage is based on the concept of meridian system (energy lines) called Prana Nadis. The influence of its Indian origin lies in Yoga philosophy and the movements and stretches of Thai massage clearly have Yoga roots. The philosophy of Yoga states that life energy (Prana, Qi, Chi, Ki) is absorbed from the air we breathe and the food we eat and that we are supplied with this vital energy along this network of energy lines (also known as the meridian system in Traditional Chinese Medicine).

Any disturbances in the flow of energy result in an insufficient supply of Prana, which can in turn leads to illness and disease. By stimulating these energy lines with massage, Thai massage can release any blockages, facilitate the free flow of Prana, and help to restore general health and wellbeing. Thai massage mainly uses ten meridians and the important acupressure points that lie on them. By massaging these meridians and points it is possible to treat a wide range of diseases and to relieve pain.

Contrary to Western style massage, traditional Thai massage concentrates on the flow of Prana and any work with the physical body is secondary. Effleurage, which dominates in Western massage, is absent from Thai massage where the emphasis is on the energy points (acupuncture points) and these are pressed, or general pressure is used. Thai massage utilises a lot of stretching and many of these resemble Yoga stretches and postures and are sometimes described as ‘applied Hatha Yoga’.

In India and Thailand, massage was always considered to be a spiritual practice closely connected with the teachings of the Buddha. Until fairly recently, it was mainly in the Buddhist temple where massage was taught and practiced. Even today one of the most important massage schools in Thailand is at the Wat Po monastery in Bangkok.

A truly good Thai masseur performs his art in a meditative mood (Chen/Zen state) while working with full awareness, mindfulness and focus, “listening” to the feedback from the Prana lines and energy flow.

Thai massage is usually done on a futon mat on the hard floor whilst wearing loose and comfortable clothing.

 

Some common ailments that Thai Massage can help with are:

  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)
  • Insomnia
  • Low energy
  • The effects of stress
  • Fatigue
  • Back pain
  • Tension
  • Stress

 

Therapist info

Thai massage stretch for the trapezius and levator scaulae muscles.

 

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Edinburgh Prana Lotus

Thai Massage in West Midlands

 

 

Resources

Further information on Thai Massage including case studies, etc.

If you wish to add further resource information about Thai Massage please contact us us with the details.

 

Please note that Holistic-Pages.com makes no guarantee regarding the validity, efficacy, or safety of any therapy and we advise that medical advice should be sought from a qualified medical practitioner regarding any illness.
Holistic-Pages.com is not responsible for the credentials, qualifications and insurance status of any of the therapists who have links from this site and we advise that these should be checked before any treatment is undertaken.

 

 

Taiji, the calm within the storm

Taiji

Taiji benefits all ages. You are never too young, or too old, to learn.

Originating in ancient China, Taiji (also written as Taiji Quan, Tai Chi, Tai Chi Chuan) has gained enormous popularity throughout the world as its health benefits have become more recognised.

Taiji, as practiced in the west today, is a usually seen as a slow, choreographed, set of posture that is used for exercise, relaxation and health. It can perhaps best be thought of as a moving meditation.

There are a number of different styles (family styles such as Chen, Yang, Li, Wu & Sun as well as the more recently formalised Beijing styles) and within these styles there are various forms which consist of a sequence of movements and postures. Originally developed as a martial art, each of these movements was formulated with self-defence in mind.

Taiji has its origins in Taoism and Taoist martial arts. The literal translation of Taiji Quan is “Supreme Ultimate Boxing.” This is not a big-headed, boastful, claim to be the supreme martial art as the term “Supreme Ultimate” refers to the Tao. The symbol that is usually referred to as the Yin/Yang symbol is actually called Taiji and it represents the duality of our perception of Tao, of which the universe is only part. Taiji, in this context, can be seen as a microcosm of the Tao (universe) as its movements, shapes and breathing patterns reflect dynamic forces and interactions of the universe.

The concept of Qi is a fundamental part of Chinese medicine and philosophy. Qi is the intrinsic energy that the universe is made of, and it is also the energy that animates the body. The movements of Taiji promote the circulation of Qi within the body creating health and vitality. The Qi circulates through pathways that are known as meridians and the meridian contain the access points that are used by acupuncture, shiatsu, tuina, etc. for their healing properties and by martial arts for their harming properties.

Using these principals, Taiji Quan is a sophisticated method of combat where the Taiji Quan practitioner aims to neutralize his opponent’s use of force (strength – Li) before “borrowing it” and applying a countering force (focus – Jing) of his own. This is the interplay of Yang and Yin.

To the uninformed, it is hard to see how these slow, graceful and fluid movements could be used for defence against someone who is attacking with speed and strength. In any confrontation, the Taiji practitioner will also move faster………… with a speed to match his attacker’s but with the same fluid, relaxed and rooted movement that has been practiced in the form. It is by practicing at a slow pace that perfection in balance, rooting and technique can be gained.

However, for the vast majority of Taiji players, the martial aspect is never really touched on and the emphasis is on the tranquillity of mind and body, along with all the health benefits, that Taiji provides.

Taiji fosters calmness and tranquillity of mind as the focus of the practitioner is solely on the precise execution of the forms. The precision that is required within the postures also helps correct poor postural alignment that can contribute to tension, excess pressure on joints, or injury.

Today we may use Taiji to rid ourselves of the fatigue that stress, overwork, poor posture and the lack of atunement with our own body can bring. It is aid that Taiji increases longevity…………. This is something that modern scientific research is starting to agree with. This longevity does not mean that you will live forever. What it does mean is that daily practice promotes a healthy body, clarity of mind, better balance, denser bones, better circulation, more balanced blood pressure, lower (more efficient) respiration, and a more efficient and active lymphatic system (assisting the immune system. The list goes on! One more thing that Taiji can do for you is that you smile more……… Great big smiles, that
come from deep within.

 

In the words of Aldous Huxley (from Island):

“No leaps, no high kicks, no running. The feet always firmly on the ground…movements intrinsically beautiful and at the same time charged with symbolic meaning. Thought taking shape in ritual and stylized gesture. The whole body transformed into a hieroglyph, a succession of hieroglyphs, of attitudes modulating from significance to significance, like a poem or a piece of music. Movements of the muscles representing movements of the consciousness…It’s meditation in action; the metaphysics of the Mahayana expressed not in words, but through symbolic movements and gestures.”

 

Therapist info

Taiji has great health benefits.

 

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Taiji, Taiji Quan & Neijia, Lanarkshire

San Bao Martial Arts School, Lanarkshire

T’ai-Chi London

Town & Village Tai Chi and Qigong is based in Carlisle but covers a large area within Northern Cumbria, running classes as far south as Shap and Penrith and as far north as Brampton.
 

 

Resources

Further information on Taiji including case studies, etc.

If you wish to add further resource information about Taiji please contact us with the details.

 

Please note that Holistic-Pages.com makes no guarantee regarding the validity, efficacy, or safety of any therapy and we advise that medical advice should be sought from a qualified medical practitioner regarding any illness.
Holistic-Pages.com is not responsible for the credentials, qualifications and insurance status of any of the therapists who have links from this site and we advise that these should be checked before any treatment is undertaken.

 

 

Craniosacral Therapy Info

Craniosacral Therapy Info

Craniosacral Therapy - back treatment

Craniosacral therapy is a gentle, hands-on healing technique, which does not involve manipulation. It is a new technique based on the work done by Dr. John E. Upledger who, in the 1980’s, discovered the CranioSacral System. Dr. Upledger is now recognised as a world-renowned authority on CranioSacral Therapy. It works directly with the body’s physiological, energetic and psycho-emotional systems and offers the opportunity of improved quality of life.

During treatment, the therapist gently mobilises and releases the craniosacral system (the soft tissue of the cranium and the spine down). It focuses on the cerebrospinal fluid, which surrounds the brain and the spinal cord, dealing with any irregularities in the flow of this fluid. The therapist listens, via the hands, to what is going on in your body, identifying any irregularities in the flow and helping to relieve any pain and tension held there.

The movement of the cerebrospinal fluid is believed to create a vital body rhythm that is important for health and well-being and it is thought that this therapy may be beneficial in treating many issues, including hyperactivity, cerebral palsy, dyslexia and stress related problems.

The craniosacral system is made up of membranes and spinal fluid that enclose and protect the brain and spinal cord. The cerebrospinal fluid is constantly circulating, moving rhythmically, and Craniosacral Practitioners learn how to monitor this movement/rhythm with their. Just as doctors are able to make certain inferences from cardiovascular and respiratory systems (heart or breathing rhythms) we can now gather information about the condition and function of the craniosacral rhythm within the body. The vibrancy and flow of this system is extremely important as the velocity and amplitude represents the
health of the system, reflecting the health of the nervous system.

Treatment usually takes place a quiet, private setting with clients remaining fully clothed. The session (typically lasting approximately one hour) is performed with the client reclining on a treatment table while the practitioner stands or sits, positioned at various times throughout the session at the client’s head, torso or feet.

Craniosacral Therapy helps to boost general well-being, improve quality of sleep, increase energy and reduce stress. It is non-intrusive and works with the entire structure, physiology, mind and spirit.

 

Therapist info

Craniosacral therapy - neck treatment

 

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The Haven, Ashburton

Dulwich Therapy Rooms

 

 

Resources

Further information on Craniosacral Therapy including case studies, etc.

If you wish to add further resource information about Craniosacral Therapy please contact us with the details.

 

Please note that Holistic-Pages.com makes no guarantee regarding the validity, efficacy, or safety of any therapy and we advise that medical advice should be sought from a qualified medical practitioner regarding any illness.
Holistic-Pages.com is not responsible for the credentials, qualifications and insurance status of any of the therapists who have links from this site and we advise that these should be checked before any treatment is undertaken.

 

 

Reiki of Dr Mikao Usui

Reiki

Reiki in action, ki transmition over the head.

The word reiki derives from the Japanese word reiki (meaning “mysterious atmosphere”), which was originally derive from the Chinese word língqì (“supernatural influence”). However, Reiki practitioners prefer to use “Universal Life Energy” as its translation.

Reiki is a system of natural healing which evolved in Japan from the experience and dedication of Dr Mikao Usui (d. 1926). Dr Usui, a Japanese doctor, developed or rediscovered Reiki towards the end of the 19th century while studying ancient Buddhist texts. He was inspired to develop this healing system from those teachings, spending many years of his life in study, research and meditation. Once Reiki was complete, he spent the rest of his life in the practising and teaching the system.

There are two main branches of Reiki, usually referred to as Traditional Japanese Reiki and Western Reiki. The main difference between them is that Westernised forms tend to use systematised hand-placements while the Japanese Reiki branches tend to have a more intuitive approach. Reiki has a three-tiered hierarchy of degrees, usually referred to as the First, Second, and Master/Teacher level, all of which are associated with different skills and techniques.

Reiki was introduced to the United States, in the 1970’s, by Hawaio Takata, a Japanese woman living in Hawaii. Takata having learned it from one of Usui’s pupils, Dr Chujiro Hayashi.

The Usui system of Reiki is a simple technique, using hands-on healing and sacred symbols that have been used for healing purposes for thousands of years. In using  Reiki techniques, the vitalizing, intrinsic force of Universal Life energy is channelled from the universe and transferred, through the hands, to various energy centres in the receiver’s body.

Reiki is said to intensify vibration of body molecules so that blockages that may cause disharmony and disease are released. It helps with all kinds of physical, mental, emotional or spiritual issues as Ki energy permeates the physical, mental, emotional, and several spiritual bodies and is fundamental to their development.

Reiki is a spiritual path (not a religion) as well as a form of healing that enhances the wellbeing of both the receiver and the giver.

During a Reiki session, the recipient remains clothed and usually lies on a couch and relaxes. The practitioner gently places their hands non-intrusively in a sequence of positions which cover the whole body. Being a holistic system, it is the whole person that is treated rather than any specific symptoms. A full treatment usually takes 1 to 1½ hours.

 

Therapist info

Reiki in action, ki transmition to the back.

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Carol Gough, Cardiff

Anita Levie, Stoke-on-Trent

Reiki South London

 

 

Resources

Further information on Reiki including case studies, etc.

If you wish to add further resource information about Reiki please contact us with the details.

 

Please note that Holistic-Pages.com makes no guarantee regarding the validity, efficacy, or safety of any therapy and we advise that medical advice should be sought from a qualified medical practitioner regarding any illness.
Holistic-Pages.com is not responsible for the credentials, qualifications and insurance status of any of the therapists who have links from this site and we advise that these should be checked before any treatment is undertaken.

 

 

Reflexology, the Ingham Method

Reflexology

Reflexology in action.

Reflexology is a form of therapy that involves applying pressure to specific reflex areas in the feet and hands which correspond to all of the glands, organs and parts of the body as well as the using massage techniques (effleurage) on the feet. Reflexology is based on the feet being a reflection of the body and, as a whole, corresponding with it. So, it is possible to find out which areas of the body are out of balance by working the feet. Treatment can also be given, via the feet, to stimulate the body’s own healing mechanism. The hands and ears also have similar reflex areas and can be used.

Reflexology traces its origin reaches back to 2330BC. In 1899 the Tomb of Ankhmahor, situated on the northern side of Teti’s pyramid at Saqqara, was excavated and some of the reliefs, on the walls, show that the ancient Egyptian physicians used a form
of reflexology. The tomb is more commonly known as the Physicain’s Tomb.

Modern Reflexology was pioneered, researched and developed in the 1930’s by Eunice Ingham. The Ingham Method is the leading method of Reflexology used throughout the world.

By stimulating the reflex points correctly, Reflexology can help many health problems in a natural way and can be used for preventative maintenance as well as reacting to any existing issues. However, the primary benefit of Reflexology is that the client can achieve a deep state of relaxation (the alpha state, where the brainwave pattern has slowed down).

 

Benefits of Reflexology:

  • Relieves stress and tension.
  • Improves circulation.
  • Increased relaxation.
  • Improve your energy
  • Reduces pain.
  • Reduces anxiety.
  • Improved sleep patterns.

 

A Reflexology session usually lasts about an hour. There is no need to get undressed as it is only the shoes and socks that are required to be removed. After a session, the client may become aware of the changes taking place as toxins are released, processed and eliminated from congested systems.

Therapist info

Reflexology chart.

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Gill Wah, Ross & Cromarty

Leeds Reflexology

Sonia Campos, Brighton

 

 

Resources

Further information on Reflexology including case studies, etc.

If you wish to add further resource information about Reflexology please contact us with the details.

 

Please note that Holistic-Pages.com makes no guarantee regarding the validity, efficacy, or safety of any therapy and we advise that medical advice should be sought from a qualified medical practitioner regarding any illness.
Holistic-Pages.com is not responsible for the credentials, qualifications and insurance status of any of the therapists who have links from this site and we advise that these should be checked before any treatment is undertaken.

 

 

Incoming search terms:

  • Ingham Method of Reflexology
  • how to use the ingham method system
  • ingahm method

Samuel Hahnemann – Homoeopathy

Homoeopathy

Samuel Hahnemann
The basic principle of homeopathy, known as the “law of similars”, is “let like be cured by like.” This was first stated by German physician Samuel Hahnemann in 1796.

 

Samuel Hahnemann

In 1790 while Hahnemann was studying the action of quinine, as a treatment of malaria, he experimented on himself by taking quinine even though he had no symptoms of malaria. This caused him to start exhibiting the classic symptoms of malaria even though he knew he was healthy. From this, he deducted that cinchona bark (the source of the quinine) could be useful in treating not only malaria, but other diseases that manifested similar symptoms. Following on from this discovery, Hahnemann went on to carry out further experiments further other common substances on his family and friends (ethics were different in those days). He discovered that by administering small doses of any substance whether it was of animal, plant or mineral origin, to a healthy person that it would cause symptoms that were discrete to the substance. Over time, he recorded his results and created a catalogue of remedies that would cause similar symptoms to many ailments.

Three main principles of homoeopathy are the law of similars, the infinitesimal dose, and the treatment of the whole person (holistic).

 

The Law Of Similars

Using the law of similar, homoeopathy uses substances that are capable of inducing similar (like) symptoms in a healthy person to treat those symptoms exhibited by the patient.

In the Organon, Hahnemann stated.. “All carefully conducted experimentation end research proved to us that persistent disease symptoms, far from being destroyed by opposite medicinal symptoms (in the conventional method), return instead with renewed intensity, after seeming for a short time to have improved”. (Organon, paragraph 23)

“Homoeopathy, by contrast, chooses from among ell the remedies whose actions upon the healthy have been established (proved), that one which has the power end propensity to produce all artificial disease conditions most similar to the natural one being treated”: (Organon, paragraph 24). This is the law of similars, being Similia Similibus Curentur, or “Let like be cured by like”.

 

The Infinitesimal Dose

“The highest ideal of therapy is to restore health … in the least harmful way”. (Organon, paragraph 2). When carrying out his initial testing, Hahnemann ‘s original experiments were designed to reduce the dose of the substance being given, while maintaining its therapeutic efficacy. What he discovered was that even infinitesimally small doses of the homoeopathic remedies were therapeutically effective. Additionally, at these minuscule doses they were completely safe and carried no risk of harmful side effects. Hahnemann
discovered that the potentised remedies not only retained the therapeutic effectiveness but were actually enhanced.

“When indicated, the smallest dose of a properly potentised medicine – in which calculation shows that there is only an infinitesimal amount of material substance left – exerts far more healing power than strong material doses of medicine”.

“This specific, invisible medicinal force of these highly potentised (homoeopathic) remedies does not depend on their material atoms, or on their physical surfaces, but depends on the invisible energy of the substance released and freed to the highest possible extent by progressive potentisation (dynamisation).” (Organon, paragraph 11)

 

The Whole Person

In treating a person homoeopathically, it is necessary to treat the person as a whole, rather than the disease that the person has.

Hahnemann stated: “In bringing about a cure the physician should consider the evident physical constitution of the patient (especially in chronic affections), his affective and intellectual character, his activities, his way of life, his habits, his social position, his family relationships, his age, his sexual life, etc”.

Conventional medicine is aimed at treating illnesses, but homoeopathy is holistic, and aims to treat the person rather than the symptoms. It is for this reason that homoeopathic treatment may require different medicines for different people suffering from the same disease.

 

Therapist info

Samuel Hahnemann - Homoeopathy

 

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Sensational Homeopathy

Shirley Harvey

 

Resources

Further information on Homoeopathy including case studies, etc.

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Please note that Holistic-Pages.com makes no guarantee regarding the validity, efficacy, or safety of any therapy and we advise that medical advice should be sought from a qualified medical practitioner regarding any illness.
Holistic-Pages.com is not responsible for the credentials, qualifications and insurance status of any of the therapists who have links from this site and we advise that these should be checked before any treatment is undertaken.

 

 

Bowen Method

Bowen Method

Bowen Method - image of a Bowen treatment

The Bowen Method was developed by Thomas A. Bowen (1916-1982) of Geelong Victoria in Australia. Bowen had a gift for healing but lacked professional training (details of his life history, professional training and work experience are in dispute) and there was an attempt by the Victorian Government to discredit him and his new technique. This prompted him to continue with vigour and it is estimated that in 1975, Bowen was treating 13,000 patients per year.
After launching an enquiry into alternative health practices, the Victorian government must have been a tad red-faced when it was discovered that not only were his clients reporting remarkable progress, Bowen was achieving these results with treatments that usually involved only two or three sessions per client. The Victorian Government’s attempt to discredit the technique turned out to be its biggest promoter.

Initially, Tom Bowen agreed to train only a half dozen students. Among those initial students were the Osteopath and Natural Therapist, Oswald Rentsch and his wife Elaine and since Bowen’s death, the Rentsch’s have led the expansion of The Bowen Method globally. They have spread Bowen throughout Australia, New Zealand, North America, the United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland, Norway, Austria, France, Italy, Israel and South Africa.

Bowen Method is a non-invasive, gentle, complementary therapy that triggers and empowers the healing and repair mechanism of the body. It uses light, precise rolling “moves” on muscles, tendons, ligaments or nerves that are at specific sites on the body. The purpose of these “moves” is to deliver signals to the nervous system that stimulate a healing response encouraging the body to return to its natural state of alignment, balance and wellbeing. In essence, Bowen Technique assists the body to heal itself, accessing the natural healing power of the body, the ability to heal ourselves.

Back and neck pain, sciatica, frozen shoulder, headaches and migraines are among the ailments that Bowen may provide relief for. Additional benefits of Bowen Therapy include improved circulation, lymphatic drainage, improved immune system function and improved elimination and detoxification.

A Bowen session usually lasts up to an hour during which the therapist will be able to perform the specified “moves” through loose light clothing. With no oils used with the Bowen Technique, the receiver has no need to strip. The therapist will gently use his fingers and thumb to roll muscles, fascia and tissue to stimulate blood flow and increase energy. Between “moves” the therapist will usually take a short pause (possibly leaving the therapy room) allowing the receiver’s body the opportunity to readjust.

 

Therapist info

Bowen Method - the Bowen logo

 

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Bath Bowen Clinic

One Space

Bowen Technique Solihull

 

Resources

Further information on the Bowen Technique including case studies, etc.

If you wish to add further resource information about Bowen Technique please contact us with the details.

Please note that Holistic-Pages.com makes no guarantee regarding the validity, efficacy, or safety of any therapy and we advise that medical advice should be sought from a qualified medical practitioner regarding any illness.
Holistic-Pages.com is not responsible for the credentials, qualifications and insurance status of any of the therapists who have links from this site and we advise that these should be checked before any treatment is undertaken.

 

 

Alexander Technique

Alexander Technique

Alexander Technique - postural realignment of the neck

Named after Frederick Matthias Alexander (20 January 1869 – 10 October 1955), the Alexander Technique teaches the practitioner methods that enable the improvement of, detrimental, physical postural habits that may have become ingrained or have become conditioned responses. It is claimed that the technique can improve performance, Proprioception and relieve chronic stiffness, tension and stress.

It was in the 1890’s when Alexander developed the principles of the technique as he battled to alleviate breathing problems and hoarseness during public speaking as he pursued his passion for Shakespearean acting. It is a form of education that is applied to recognize and overcome reactive, habitual limitations in movement and thinking.

When Alexander’s throat became extremely hoarse during his orations, he sought medical advice but the doctors could find no physical cause. Deciding on self-help, Alexander began observing his posture and movement, looking in mirrors at his posture, while trying to diagnose what was causing his problem.
Over the next nine years he developed the Alexander Technique. He felt that the
restoration of his voice was nothing short of a miracle for him and he decided that his system could work for others, naming it “Primary Control”.

The hypothesis is that the head, neck, and torso are primary factors in the determination of function, movement, and posture. Through observation and trial, he learned that by compressing any of these, the body did not function efficiently. He noted that in his own case, this had led to poor posture, resulting in the hoarseness of his voice. He also realised that his new system would be beneficial for others with different problems.

Alexander Technique is usually taught, or worked, on a one to one basis. It is occasionally taught in group sessions although this is not standard practice. The Alexander Technique usually requires the practitioner to employ physiotherapy techniques in addition to postural education in order for the client to have more efficient use of their body.

The idea of the Alexander Technique is to provide a physiotherapy that will allow muscles to become relaxed. This is said to give people back the posture they should have had all along. The body is worked with the human form as a whole, and so doing the Alexander Technique is said to have effects for all parts of the body.

Alexander’s technique addresses postural issues, alleviating the symptoms relating to them and is, generally, not used to treat major disabilities or illnesses.

 

Therapist info

Alexander Technique - Postural realignment

 

 

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Alexander Technique, BrightonTechnique, Brighton

Kate Howe, London Alexander Technique

 

Resources

Further information on the Alexander Technique including case studies, etc.

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