All posts by Wellbeing

Ten Fundamental Treasures Qigong Course – Scotland

Ten Fundamental Treasures Qigong Course –  June 2018

As part of their ongoing courses, San Bao School is running a Ten Fundamental Treasures Qigong course in East Kilbride, South Lanarkshire. The two-day coursecovers the ten exercises, in depth, and provides beginners with a great foundation in Qigong while, at the same time, introducing more advanced practitioners to the subtleties contained within each exercise.

Ten Fundamental Treasures Qigong courseQigong (Chi Kung) is the art of working with energy, your life energy.  The external movements are only a small portion of the work that is being done as the practitioner moves their Qi around the meridian system.  To the external viewer, Qigong can look like slowed down aerobics but these exercises are much, much, more than that.  The external movements are there to assist the practitioner to prompt internal movement in their Qi.

True Qigong is only achieved when there is internal movement and waving your arms around while bobbing up and down is a very poor mimicry of this wonderful art .

The Ten Fundamental Treasures

  • Uphold the Heavens to Empower the Three Burning Spaces (San Jiao)
  • Harmonising Spleen and Stomach
  • Looking Backward
  • Pulling the Bow to Shoot the Hawk
  • Shaking the Head and Waving the Tail
  • Holding the Fists Tightly and Gazing with Angry Eyes
  • Abdominal Lift
  • Spring with the Toes
  • Hold the Toes and Strengthen the Kidneys
  • Change the Sinews (Yi Chin)

 

This San Bao Qigong course is relaxed and allows everybody to learn at their own pace.  There is no rush, no pressure, and no competition.

 

 

Qigong course details:

  • Location – East Kilbride, South Lanarkshire
  • Date – 10th & 11th June 2017
  • Time – 10.00 till 16:00
  • Details – Focusing on posture, on learning Qigong, in depth, and gaining awareness of Qi flow.
  • Cost – £120.00
  • Booking – Pro Holistic Qigong Courses Scotland
  • Instructor – Des Lawton
  • Further information – ‘Phone Des on 01355266011 or use the form on the Contact Us

 

 

Location of course

 

 

Embroidered Brocade Qigong Courses – 2017

Embroidered Brocade Qigong is rooted in the principles of Taiji and is especially beneficial to Taiji players.  It takes around  20 –30 minutes to do the whole set.

Course date: Saturday 11th November 2017

Embroidered Brocade Qigong

Sequence:

  • Folding Over
  • Circle of Light
  • Catching a Ball (aka Billowing Sail)
  • The Five Elements (aka The Sun and the Moon)
  • The White Crane
  • The Snake
  • The Taiji Walk

Workshop details:

  • Location – East Kilbride, South Lanarkshire – location map
  • Dates – Saturday 14th May, and Saturday 26th November 2016
  • Time – 10.00 till 17:00
  • Cost – £60.00
  • Details – Focusing on posture, on learning Qigong, in depth, and gaining awareness of Qi flow.
  • Instructor – Des Lawton
  • Guidelines – Can be viewed here

For further datails and booking, visit Pro Holistic – Embroidered Brocade Qigong course

Taiji Shibashi (十八) Instructors course

Taiji Shibashi Instructors Course – 2017

The Taiji Qigong Shibashi (十八) Instructor course is designed to provide Qigong instructors with all the tools and information needed to teach the Shibashi as true Qigong.

The Shibashi (also known as the Eighteen Postures of Taiji Qigong) is a set of Qigong exercises based on Taiji that adheres to the rules governing Taiji stances (in particular, the Wuji stance). These stances are fundamentally important if the practitioner wishes to get the most out of the Qigong.

Since the early 1980′s, when the Shibashi was introduced, in, the significance of the Taiji stances has been lost and their true use as Qigong has been diminished and the beneficial qualities have depleted.  Without a solid base (root) there is a conflict of focus and the cognitive mind (Yi) cannot be fully focused on guiding the Qi.  This being the case, during the course a lot of time is spent on attaining and recognizing proper posture.

Testimonials:

  • “……………… just wanted to thank you for a wonderful weekend.  It was brilliant, I really enjoyed it.  I gained much more than I expected to.  Thanks for opening my eyes.”
  • “Attending this Workshop was a very motivational experience; an exercise of discovery providing a brief insight into the amazing power of QiGong. I would recommend this inspirational workshop to all who have an interest in QiGong”
  • “I discovered that qigong was more powerful than I had ever imagined.  An excellent weekend and I learned so much more about myself that can be brought into my classes, I now feel more confident that I can deliver qigong more effectively to my students and also enjoy the benefits for myself, thank you so much.”
  • “I am so glad that I made the decision to attend a truly inspirational workshop and to have benefited from an introduction to the amazing powers of QiGong. I am aware that we only experienced an ‘insight’ but even so I consider that I am now in a better position to pass on quality teaching to my students, and having been an FE Lecturer for many years, I believe delivering quality is of paramount importance.
    I also thank you (and your wife) for your hospitality in providing delicious lunches and snacks – greatly appreciated!”
  • “Just thought I should send you a wee message to let you know how much doing the Qigong instructors course has helped me personally. I had just started 4th year at Uni when I came on the course. Uni has been horrendous and a few times it has been bad enough to make me consider leaving but doing Qigong has been a life saver. It has got me through some very tough times.
    Big thank you to you for teaching me this beautiful art. Qigong had definitely came into my life at the right time.”
  • “Thanks des. Really exceeded expectations. Will take time to assimilate the information properly before introducing to my classes.”
  • “Really interesting weekend – it has inspired me to continue on my path for which I thank you so much.”
  • “Learning about Chi and feeling the Chi was an experience.”
  • “Thoroughly enjoyed the whole experience.”
  • “Thank you Des. Really enjoyed the workshop and your style of teaching the group.”
  • “Excellent instructor, easily understood, good analysis, some helpful tips and suggestions. Thank you.”
  • “Really interesting course. Made me want to learn more about he background and how move have different effects on the various parts of the body.”
  • “Felt better about the postures and learning to be aware about the postures.”
  • “This has been a truly wonderful course.”
  • “A brilliant training course.”

 

Next course: –

Dates: Jan 28th & 29th, Feb 25th, and April 1st & 2nd 2017
Times: 10:00 till 17:00
Location: East Kilbride, Lanarkshire
Cost: £360.00
Booking: Pro Holistic Taiji Shibashi Qigong Instructor Course

A deposit of £60.00 is required, with the balance to be paid on the first day of the course. As spaces are limited, advanced booking is essential.

 

Taiji Shibashi Qigong Course

Taiji Shibashi Qigong Course –  2016

The Tai Chi Chi Kung Shibashi (十八), or the eighteen postures of Tai Chi Chi Kung, is a set of Chi Kung exercises that utilise Tai Chi stances and adhere to the rules governing them. Although this set was brought together in the 1980’s the individual exercises themselves date back centuries, even millenia.

The Shibashi Chi Kung focus on health and well-being, directing and promoting the flow of chi through the meridians. Although each of them can be practiced individually, or in any variation, the set flows beautifully, from one posture to the next,producing a feeling of inner calmness and wellbeing.

The health benefits from the Shibashi become clear when they are practiced regularly and, in effect, you are being proactive with your health and wellbeing. The Shibashi are easy to learn and can easily be practiced in a restricted space where the Tai Chi forms would be impossible.

Feedback from previous workshops

  • Did the workshop meet your expectations? – 100% Yes.
  • Did the workshop cover the syllabus? – 100% Yes.
  • Were the methods taught useful? – 100% Yes.
  • Would you recommend this workshop? – 100% Yes.
  • Is there anything you would like to see added to the syllabus? “Perhaps guidlines about how best to practice with a view to building confidence to teach others” *This is included in the Instructor Course.

“Really enjoyed this workshop – couldn’t have been better, fantastic day and I feel like I learned an enormous amount and had fun doing it!”
“I really liked that the meridians were mentioned within the exercises and found this useful.”
“I felt very well lead throughout the exercises and supported – thought it was a great course.”

 

The Shibashi Qigong course is suitable for everyone including: –

  • Beginners
  • Tai Chi practitioners
  • Chi Kung practitioners
  • Reiki practitioners
  • Shiatsu practitioners
  • Physiotherapists
  • Rehabilitation therapists
  • Exercise instructors
  • Group leaders

This Shibashi Qigong course, which can be used towards our certificated Shibashi Instructor course, provides a firm grounding in the Tai Chi Shibashi Chi Kung system.

Shibashi Qigong course information: –

Dates: Jan 23rd, Feb 27th & March 26th  2016
Times: 10:00 till 17:00
Location: East Kilbride, South Lanarkshire
Cost: £70.00 per workshop, or £180.00 for the block of three.
Booking:  Pro-Holistic Taiji Shibashi Course

A deposit of £30.00 per workshop is required, with the balance to be paid on the first day of the course. Advanced booking is essential.

Further details of courses on Pro-Holistic Courses

This course is being provided by San Bao Martial Arts

Qigong Basics, getting the most from Qigong

Qigong Basics

Qigong Basics - Qigong for health being practiced at sunset.

Qigong (pronounced Chi-Kung) is an ancient Chinese art for the promotion of health and, when written in Chinese, the word Qigong is comprised of two characters: Qi (anima, vital energy) and Gong (work, cultivation)…………… Qigong literally means energy work, or energy cultivation.  Before this work can be carried out effectively, the Qigong basics must be understood.

There are four main divisions of Qigong, and two methods.

Firstly, let us deal with the divisions of Qigong

  • Spiritual
  • Medical
  • Martial
  • Athletic

The choice of which method that is used is dependent on the goal of the practitioner. However, there is some overlap between the each of the methods.

 

Secondly, the two methods

  • Active qigong – Where physical movement is used to help the practitioner to guide the Qi.
  • Passive Qigong – Where there is no physical movement and it is purely the Yi (cognitive mind) that is used to guide the Qi.

The division of Qigong that we are dealing with here is Medical Qigong. This is a branch of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and according to TCM, Qi is life energy and the health of the body is reliant upon smooth, harmonious, flow of Qi within the body and disease is the result of poor Qi circulation and through Qigong it is possible to balance the flow of Qi allowing the body to heal itself.

The Qi is the intrinsic energy, the life force that we share with the rest of the natural world. Qi also refers to energy in the largest sense, it is the stuff of the universe, it is both matter and energy and link that bonds them together. Qi transcends and is not bounded by time or space.

Qigong works by using specific postures and movements of the body whilst combining them with focus (using directed breath) and intention. Through the use of these exercises, the Qi can be cultivated and replenished.

As previously stated, in the precept of Traditional Chinese Medicine is that all diseases are a result of blockage in the meridians (energy channels), causing obstructions and sluggishness in the flow of Qi. A person is healthy only when the Qi freely circulates through the meridians, nourishing all vital organs and tissues. The “Yellow Emperor’s Canon of Internal Medicine” (circa 250BC) states: “When the Qi is blocked, there is sickness. No blockage – no sickness”.

Literally thousands of styles of Qi Gong exist so it is a matter of finding the one that is suitable for your needs. Some styles are designed for general health and wellbeing and require daily practice. Other styles/exercises have specific therapeutic qualities and have been developed to treat specific ailments.

Qi Gong can be practiced by just about anyone, whether they are young or old, active, sedentary, or disabled.

Although there are many styles, they are founded on similar principles

  • A relaxed, grounded posture
  • A straight, supple spine
  • Breathing that uses the diaphragm
  • Fluid movement
  • Tranquil awareness

The quality of the Qi Gong practice is far more important than how often the practice is undertaken. Any aerobic exercise can be slowed down to the point where it appears, superficially, to resemble Qigong but as there is no intent, no focus and no guidance of the Qi, it is NOT Qigong.

It is far more beneficial to concentrate one or two styles, learning through experiential awareness than to learn many exercises superficially. It is vitally important to find a good Qigong teacher who has experience of Qi rather than experience of books.

 

Qigong Teachers

Qigong Basics - Painting rainbows,qigong style.

 

If you wish your website to be included on this page please see our Resources Page for details.

 

 

Healing Qigong at Pro Holistic, Lanarkshire

San Bao Martial Arts School

 

Resources

Further information on Qigong including case studies, etc.

If you wish to add further resource information about Qigong please contact us with the details.us with the details.

 

Please note that Holistic-Pages.com makes no guarantee regarding the validity, efficacy, or safety of any therapy and we advise that medical advice should be sought from a qualified medical practitioner regarding any illness.
Holistic-Pages.com is not responsible for the credentials, qualifications and insurance status of any of the therapists who have links from this site and we advise that these should be checked before any treatment is undertaken.

 

 

Stress Management the Holistic Way

Stress Management

Stress management - stress can affect anyone, even the carers.

Stress management refers to a variety of techniques and psychotherapies that are designed to controlling stress levels within an individual, especially chronic stress.

We all know, or at least think we know, what stress is but even the professionals, who have spent their lives studying it, still have difficulty in exactly what stress is. Despite their efforts over the last half-century there is still no agreed definition yet we all know what stress is, in the same way that we all know what happiness is, but like happiness it has different qualities for different people.

Basically, stress is a term that describes our natural fight or flight response. Our primeval survival response that helped our species to continue existing. It is this inborn response that prepares us for fight or flight from anything that we perceive as dangerous, or a threat to our survival. And in the interests of our survival, this response is extremely sensitive and is set to recognise and react to even minute levels of potential danger, whether it is real or merely a perception.

In the 21st Century we may not be being chased by sabre-toothed tigers but this response to danger is still hard-wired into our system. Today’s modern stressors produce the same emotional and physical response but are brought on by a perceived imbalance between demands placed and what resources and time are available. They can be the result of fear of missing a deadline, of making a mistake in a tender, of not getting the job right, of redundancy, of not matching up to one’s peers…………… the list goes on. This means that you experience stress whenever you are faced with an event or situation that you perceive as challenging to your ability to cope. If you see the event or situation as only mildly challenging, you will probably feel only a little stress; however, if you perceive the situation or event as threatening or overwhelming your coping abilities, you will probably feel a lot of stress.

Is this, in itself bad? No, not really. Imagine the relief and sense of achievement of the caveman who has outrun the sabre-toothed tiger………….. Stress is a motivator and, on completion of a successful task, it can be rewarded and the stress levels drop to be replaced by a feeling of euphoria…………… However, it rarely works that way and one stressor can be piled on another until coping is no longer possible. Daily exposure to stressors can have negative consequences by causing hyper-vigilance or over-reaction during times when a state of calm awareness would be more productive. With daily exposure to these stressors, stress hormones can accumulate in the body and cause feelings of being burnt-out or depressed.

 

Effects of stress hormones

Stress hormones act by mobilizing energy from storage to muscles, increasing heart rate, blood pressure and breathing rate and shutting down metabolic processes such as digestion, reproduction, growth and immunity.

Constant stress causes continual release of various stress hormones which can cause:

  • High blood pressure
  • Stress-induced hypertension
  • Effects on metabolic processes
  • Lowered energy levels
  • Stomach ulcers
  • Decrease in testosterone levels in males
  • Irregular menstrual cycles in females
  • Lowered immune system

Research has shown that stress hormones are a major contributing factor in many major illnesses including cancer, heart disease and diabetes. Certain skin disorders, infections and psychological problems like generalised anxiety, panic, OCD, PTSD, depression, dissociative disorder, phobias and psychosis, have also been linked to cumulative stress.

 

Self-help methods of managing stress

  • Exercise – The easiest way to deal with cumulative stress is through physical exercise. During exercise, we metabolise excessive stress hormones and restore our body and mind to a calmer, more relaxed state. Even five to ten minutes of exercise, where a sweat has been worked up, will metabolise stress hormones and prevent their excessive  build-up. Exercise releases endorphins, which help us to feel better.
  • Taiji – Developed by the ancient Chinese, Taiji is one of the internal (soft) martial. It is increasingly practised in the West as a means of stress management and holistic exercise. Taiji is a series of slow, choreographed movements, or postures. At the core of Taiji is the concept of life essence, or Qi (pronounced ‘chee’), that flows, in meridians, through the body. When the flow of Qi is disrupted, illness is the result. Regular practice of Taiji is said to strengthen and improve Qi and according to scientific studies, Taiji is an effective healing tool for a range of disorders, particularly chronic (for example, arthritis and heart disease) and stress related conditions.
  • Qigong – Qi Gong is a combination of meditation and gentle, fluid, body movement with an emphasis on abdominal breathing. The, proper, practice of Qigong fills the mind to the point where there is no room for the stressors that permeate our daily lives. It is extremely difficult to empty our minds, our thoughts. The universe loves a vacuum and as we try to empty our mind, it takes the opportunity to fill it to overflowing. With Qigong the mind becomes full, full of one thing, the focus on the Qigong exercise. There is no room for anything else and this lets the practitioner step into the eye of the hurricane, to that calm spot where the stresses of life are absent. From there, these stresses can be observed with an air of detachment and life can be prioritised in a way that is beneficial to body, mind and spirit.
  • Meditation – It does not necessarily take years of meditation to combat stress. Meditation provides stillness and nourishment for our conscious (spirit) brain (cognitive mind) and. There are many types of meditation to choose from but they all share the understanding that the more you meditate, the lower the stress levels and the better you will feel. Zen meditation is particularly good for reducing stress levels.
    During Zen meditation, you become more accepting of your thoughts and feelings and how they relate to the world around you. This enables you to reassess your life, your goals and your relationship with the world, enabling your mind to become increasingly peaceful.

 

Therapist info

Stress management - stress can lead to poor, physical, health.

 

If you wish your website to be included on this page please see our Resources Page for details.

 

 

Pro Holistic Stress Management, Glasgow

 

 

Resources

Further information on Stress Management including case studies, etc.

If you wish to add further resource information about Stress Management please contact us with the details.

 

Please note that Holistic-Pages.com makes no guarantee regarding the validity, efficacy, or safety of any therapy and we advise that medical advice should be sought from a qualified medical practitioner regarding any illness.
Holistic-Pages.com is not responsible for the credentials, qualifications and insurance status of any of the therapists who have links from this site and we advise that these should be checked before any treatment is undertaken.

 

 

Qigong for Chronic Lower Back Pain

Qigong for Chronic Lower Back Pain

Lower back pain is a symptom that can have a multitude of causes.  Any, gentle, exercise where the muscles are being relaxed and toned and the vertebrae are being manipulated tend to be good for alleviating back pain.  Using simple exercises, Qigong for chronic lower back pain, can speed up recovery  and continued practice maintains mobility flexibility and strength.

For example, one Qigong exercise that can be done (both standing and seated) is from the set known as the Shibashi.  It is easy to learn and you only need to do 6 to 8 repetitions on a daily basis to gain the benefits.  It is not an instant cure, it will take time and that time is dependent on the current pain levels and mobility.

This is the seated variation of “Rowing the Boat”.

 

Sitting, upright, on a firm chair (dining chair, etc) with the visualisation that your head is suspended by a single thread, from the crown. The arms hang, loosely, at the sides and the feet are placed flat on the floor.  The speed of the movement is guided by your speed of breathing…………. try to relax and take your time.

Qigong for chronic lower back pain

 

 

On inhalation, bring both hands above the head (as though surrendering) and gently curl the fingers as though you were holding the oars of a boat.

 

 

 

Qigong for chronic lower back pain

 

As you exhale, bend the body forward at the waist, letting the chest drop onto the thighs, circling the arms forward and down.  As the arms swing to their lowest point, let the head hang down (this will increase the gentle stretch on the lower back).  Finally swing the arms to the rear.

 

 

On inhalation, continue swinging the arms back, to your comfortable limit, and slowly straighten up (uncurling from the lower back,  keeping the chin gently tucked in until the body is upright), and raise the arms above the head, opening the hands and turning the palms forward.

 

Remember to uncurl from the lower back, keeping the head hanging forward with the chin tucked in.  Repeat six to eight times.

Shiatsu in Hospitals – evidence of efficacy

In a film about Shiatsu in hospitals that was based on over 30,000 Shiatsu treatments in a number of Vienna hospitals, over a 15 year period, the following statements have been made by some of the doctors and clinicians who took part.

 

Doctor Volker Korbei – Gynaecologist

“The question is not Shiatsu or academic medicine. The answer for me is that Shiatsu should fit into normal medicine.   The new definition should be: Who can heal should heal.  Who can heal has to be embraced.  And shiatsu is right there.”

“If you need an artificial hip, a Shiatsu therapist cannot help you.  If you want to avoid the artificial hip you’re better off with a Shiatsu therapist.  There is a whole range of problems and diseases where conventional medicine should be promoted and there are problems and diseases, the ones that are left over, where we should be looking at other ways of treating.  There are other therapies but with Shiatsu you fare better, it’s cheaper and you attain better health and quality of life.”

 

Professor Doctor Heinz Kuderna – Surgery

“In this period 120 patients were treated.  Eighty percent of these patients really improved.  About half of the patients improved in a really convincing way that surpassed all our expectations.”

 

Doctor Ingrid Rapatz – Psychotherapist

“In my experience shiatsu is very intensive and it is perceived by the patients as very pleasant and beneficial.  What I hear very often and what I experienced myself, because I enjoyed shiatsu myself, is that Shiatsu creates a holistic sense of feeling better.”

 

Doctor Christian Korbl – Psychiatrist

“I have known about Hara Shiatsu for many years co-operating with Tomas Nelissen on a project with psychiatric in-patients. In the area of substance abuse, patients fond it most important to achieve relaxation and balance.  The benefit we noticed most quickly was improved sleep patterns.  We were able to reduce, noticeably, the amount of drugs.  This was noticed by the patients themselves.  For treating psychosomatic disorders Hara Shiatsu offers a completely new way to get to the root of the problem: through the body.  Patients with psychosomatic disorders often express conflict though the body, or the problem manifests in the body.”

 

Doctor Bernhard Kluger – Psychosomatic Medicine

“Before, our access was primarily through “psych” – namely psychotherapy.  The new additional possibilities that Shiatsu has opened up for us is a direct approach through the body.  It has opened a direct route to the children’s emotions through the body. “

 

The full video can be seen here

 

 

Women’s Self Defence Course – East Kilbride March 2013

Women’s Self Defence Course

The Women’s Self Defence course focuses on practical, no nonsense, self-defence techniques for women.   It is not designed to teach all the complexities of a martial art where it can take  years of practice before you can defend yourself properly. What it does teach is  a method by which you can effectively defend yourself using a handful of proven techniques that will help you overcome most situations.You are not required to be particularly fit to take part in this programme, however if you are significantly overweight, elderly, have not exercised for a long period of time, or suffer from diabetes, heart, respiratory or back problems, it is advisable to consult your doctor before commencing any type of training.

 

PARTICIPANTS’ REASONS FOR ENROLING

  • “I work in a pub so it means finishing late at night, so I signed up for the course
    in case I ever need to defend myself.”
  • “I just want to be able to defend myself when I am out alone and it will be handy
    at home because I live by myself.”
  • “All I came for was to learn how to protect myself because I think it is important
    that you can.”
  • “I’d just like to be able to feel safe and know that I can defend myself should
    something happen as you just don’t know what people are capable of sometimes.”
  • “I think being able to defend yourself is important as anything can happen and you
    need to be prepared for this. I thought this course would be ideal for me to learn
    how to.”

PARTICIPANTS’ FEEDBACK

  • “Very good course – has made me consider my surroundings on a night out and my abilities to get out of a situation.”
  • “Gave confidence so as not to be fearful and that you do not need to use brute force.”
  • “The course has given me confidence to defend myself.”
  • “Excellent course and the instructor was very informative.”
  • “I loved finding out all about the pressure points.”
  • “I have really enjoyed this class; I hope that I won’t need to use it though.”

 

RESULTS FROM OUR FEEDBACK FORM

 

  • Did the course meet your expectations? 100% YES
  • Did the course cover the syllabus? 100% YES
  • Were the tools/methods taught useful? 100% YES
  • Do you feel more enabled as a result of the course? 100% YES
  • Do you think that a ten-week course was long enough? 100% YES
  • Would you recommend this course? 100% YES

 

SYLLABUS – LECTURE CONTENTS

  • Prevention and Avoidance
  • Awareness and Self Confidence
  • Fear and its Effects – adrenaline and how to make use of it
  • Strike Effectively

 

SYLLABUS – PRACTICAL WORKSHOP CONTENTS

  • Awareness and posture
  • Psychological defence
  • Wrist hold escapes
  • Clothing hold escapes
  • Arm hold escapes
  • Choke hold escapes
  • Hair hold escapes
  • Using your voice effectively
  • Finger locks
  • Wrist locks
  • Arm locks
  • Shoulder locks
  • Choke holds
  • Take down methods
  • Body weapons – effective strikes
  • Utilising weapons to hand

 

Location – East Kilbride/Glasgow
Date – Commences on Tuesday 5th March 2013
Time – 21:00 till 22:00
Cost – £80.00

N.B. Pre-booking is essential.  Deposits (£10.00) can be made through Paypal at Pro Holistic

This course is being provided by San Bao

Self Shiatsu for headache relief

Self Shiatsu for headache relief

Did you know that you can use Self Shiatsu for headache relief? We all know what it is like to have a pounding headache.  Our usual response is to reach for the painkillers but what can we do when there are none at hand?  Well, one option open to us is to do some self Shiatsu and stimulate some, easily accessible and easily remembered, acupoints.

It is best that these are stimulated at the onset of the headache while you are able to focus on what you are doing rather than waiting until the headache is in full flow.

 

GB1diagram of GB meridian (Level with the eye corner, on the temple): Apply finger pressure and hold for 20 to 30 seconds.

GB14 (Above the middle of the eyebrow in the small groove that is halfway up the forehead):  Finger pressure and/or small massaging rotations for 20 to 30 seconds.

GB 12 (Below and behind the mastoid process): Apply finger pressure and hold for 20 to 30 seconds.

GB 20 (At the base of the skull, between the two large muscles [trapezius and the sternocleidomastoid]).  Apply finger pressure and hold for 20 to 30 seconds.

 

diagram of LI meridian

LI4 (Midway between the joint of the thumb and the index finger, and the border of the
web): Known as “The Great Eliminator” this point draws energy (qi) away from the head).  Apply thumb pressure and hold for 20 to 30 seconds.

 

 

 

The time quoted for stimulation is an approximation.  A good guide is that you hold the acupoint until any discomfort, from the finger pressure, starts to subside.

Easy to remember, easy to do, and all without ingesting chemicals.