Tag Archives: energy

Ten Fundamental Treasures Qigong Course – Scotland

Ten Fundamental Treasures Qigong Course –  June 2017

As part of their ongoing courses, San Bao School is running a Ten Fundamental Treasures Qigong course in East Kilbride, South Lanarkshire. The two-day coursecovers the ten exercises, in depth, and provides beginners with a great foundation in Qigong while, at the same time, introducing more advanced practitioners to the subtleties contained within each exercise.

Ten Fundamental Treasures Qigong courseQigong (Chi Kung) is the art of working with energy, your life energy.  The external movements are only a small portion of the work that is being done as the practitioner moves their Qi around the meridian system.  To the external viewer, Qigong can look like slowed down aerobics but these exercises are much, much, more than that.  The external movements are there to assist the practitioner to prompt internal movement in their Qi.

True Qigong is only achieved when there is internal movement and waving your arms around while bobbing up and down is a very poor mimicry of this wonderful art .

The Ten Fundamental Treasures

  • Uphold the Heavens to Empower the Three Burning Spaces (San Jiao)
  • Harmonising Spleen and Stomach
  • Looking Backward
  • Pulling the Bow to Shoot the Hawk
  • Shaking the Head and Waving the Tail
  • Holding the Fists Tightly and Gazing with Angry Eyes
  • Abdominal Lift
  • Spring with the Toes
  • Hold the Toes and Strengthen the Kidneys
  • Change the Sinews (Yi Chin)

 

This San Bao Qigong course is relaxed and allows everybody to learn at their own pace.  There is no rush, no pressure, and no competition.

 

 

Qigong course details:

  • Location – East Kilbride, South Lanarkshire
  • Date – 10th & 11th June 2017
  • Time – 10.00 till 16:00
  • Details – Focusing on posture, on learning Qigong, in depth, and gaining awareness of Qi flow.
  • Cost – £120.00
  • Booking – Pro Holistic Qigong Courses Scotland
  • Instructor – Des Lawton
  • Further information – ‘Phone Des on 01355266011 or use the form on the Contact Us

 

 

Location of course

 

 

Can Crystal Healing Help

Can Crystal Healing Help?

crystal healing - crystals

Crystal healing is the placement of crystals over the chakras and subtle energy centres of the body. During treatment, the practitioner will choose what crystals they deem best suited for the client utilising its energy healing qualities for their specific needs. Crystal healing has the ability to clear and remove energy blocks within the aura that cause physical and emotional distress, helping to deal with past trauma, phobias, addictions, etc.

According to practitioners of Crystal Therapy, each Crystal has its own healing qualities and although they can be used individually it is more common for a combination of crystals to be used. Some examples of the healing qualities are: –

Carnelian: 2nd chakra. Helps asthma, and blood pressure. And affects the circulatory system, kidneys, stimulate appetite, emotions, sexuality, physical energy, celebration, reproductive system, menstrual cramps, arthritis, kidneys, gall bladder, pancreas. Confidence, assertiveness, drive, Balance creativity and mental processes.

Emerald: 4th to 7th chakra. Lifts depression and relieves insomnia. Has a tranquillising effect on the heart (emotions). Respiratory system, heart, lymph nodes, blood, thymus, balance blood sugar, childbirth, eyesight. Strengthen heart chakra for growth, peace, harmony, patience, love, and honesty.

Sourced from
Pro-Holistic.co.uk

 

Therapist info

Crystal healing - crystals

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Crystal Healing Scotland

Crystal Paths

 

Resources

Further information on Crystal Therapy including case studies, etc.

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Please note that Holistic-Pages.com makes no guarantee regarding the validity, efficacy, or safety of any therapy and we advise that medical advice should be sought from a qualified medical practitioner regarding any illness.
Holistic-Pages.com is not responsible for the credentials, qualifications and insurance status of any of the therapists who have links from this site and we advise that these should be checked before any treatment is undertaken.

 

 

Thai Massage and the Prana Nadis

Thai Massage

Thai massage stretch for the triceps muscle.

It is thought that Thai massage has its earliest roots in India and has been a healing therapy for millennia.

Theoretically, Thai massage is based on the concept of meridian system (energy lines) called Prana Nadis. The influence of its Indian origin lies in Yoga philosophy and the movements and stretches of Thai massage clearly have Yoga roots. The philosophy of Yoga states that life energy (Prana, Qi, Chi, Ki) is absorbed from the air we breathe and the food we eat and that we are supplied with this vital energy along this network of energy lines (also known as the meridian system in Traditional Chinese Medicine).

Any disturbances in the flow of energy result in an insufficient supply of Prana, which can in turn leads to illness and disease. By stimulating these energy lines with massage, Thai massage can release any blockages, facilitate the free flow of Prana, and help to restore general health and wellbeing. Thai massage mainly uses ten meridians and the important acupressure points that lie on them. By massaging these meridians and points it is possible to treat a wide range of diseases and to relieve pain.

Contrary to Western style massage, traditional Thai massage concentrates on the flow of Prana and any work with the physical body is secondary. Effleurage, which dominates in Western massage, is absent from Thai massage where the emphasis is on the energy points (acupuncture points) and these are pressed, or general pressure is used. Thai massage utilises a lot of stretching and many of these resemble Yoga stretches and postures and are sometimes described as ‘applied Hatha Yoga’.

In India and Thailand, massage was always considered to be a spiritual practice closely connected with the teachings of the Buddha. Until fairly recently, it was mainly in the Buddhist temple where massage was taught and practiced. Even today one of the most important massage schools in Thailand is at the Wat Po monastery in Bangkok.

A truly good Thai masseur performs his art in a meditative mood (Chen/Zen state) while working with full awareness, mindfulness and focus, “listening” to the feedback from the Prana lines and energy flow.

Thai massage is usually done on a futon mat on the hard floor whilst wearing loose and comfortable clothing.

 

Some common ailments that Thai Massage can help with are:

  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)
  • Insomnia
  • Low energy
  • The effects of stress
  • Fatigue
  • Back pain
  • Tension
  • Stress

 

Therapist info

Thai massage stretch for the trapezius and levator scaulae muscles.

 

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Edinburgh Prana Lotus

Thai Massage in West Midlands

 

 

Resources

Further information on Thai Massage including case studies, etc.

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Please note that Holistic-Pages.com makes no guarantee regarding the validity, efficacy, or safety of any therapy and we advise that medical advice should be sought from a qualified medical practitioner regarding any illness.
Holistic-Pages.com is not responsible for the credentials, qualifications and insurance status of any of the therapists who have links from this site and we advise that these should be checked before any treatment is undertaken.

 

 

Taiji, the calm within the storm

Taiji

Taiji benefits all ages. You are never too young, or too old, to learn.

Originating in ancient China, Taiji (also written as Taiji Quan, Tai Chi, Tai Chi Chuan) has gained enormous popularity throughout the world as its health benefits have become more recognised.

Taiji, as practiced in the west today, is a usually seen as a slow, choreographed, set of posture that is used for exercise, relaxation and health. It can perhaps best be thought of as a moving meditation.

There are a number of different styles (family styles such as Chen, Yang, Li, Wu & Sun as well as the more recently formalised Beijing styles) and within these styles there are various forms which consist of a sequence of movements and postures. Originally developed as a martial art, each of these movements was formulated with self-defence in mind.

Taiji has its origins in Taoism and Taoist martial arts. The literal translation of Taiji Quan is “Supreme Ultimate Boxing.” This is not a big-headed, boastful, claim to be the supreme martial art as the term “Supreme Ultimate” refers to the Tao. The symbol that is usually referred to as the Yin/Yang symbol is actually called Taiji and it represents the duality of our perception of Tao, of which the universe is only part. Taiji, in this context, can be seen as a microcosm of the Tao (universe) as its movements, shapes and breathing patterns reflect dynamic forces and interactions of the universe.

The concept of Qi is a fundamental part of Chinese medicine and philosophy. Qi is the intrinsic energy that the universe is made of, and it is also the energy that animates the body. The movements of Taiji promote the circulation of Qi within the body creating health and vitality. The Qi circulates through pathways that are known as meridians and the meridian contain the access points that are used by acupuncture, shiatsu, tuina, etc. for their healing properties and by martial arts for their harming properties.

Using these principals, Taiji Quan is a sophisticated method of combat where the Taiji Quan practitioner aims to neutralize his opponent’s use of force (strength – Li) before “borrowing it” and applying a countering force (focus – Jing) of his own. This is the interplay of Yang and Yin.

To the uninformed, it is hard to see how these slow, graceful and fluid movements could be used for defence against someone who is attacking with speed and strength. In any confrontation, the Taiji practitioner will also move faster………… with a speed to match his attacker’s but with the same fluid, relaxed and rooted movement that has been practiced in the form. It is by practicing at a slow pace that perfection in balance, rooting and technique can be gained.

However, for the vast majority of Taiji players, the martial aspect is never really touched on and the emphasis is on the tranquillity of mind and body, along with all the health benefits, that Taiji provides.

Taiji fosters calmness and tranquillity of mind as the focus of the practitioner is solely on the precise execution of the forms. The precision that is required within the postures also helps correct poor postural alignment that can contribute to tension, excess pressure on joints, or injury.

Today we may use Taiji to rid ourselves of the fatigue that stress, overwork, poor posture and the lack of atunement with our own body can bring. It is aid that Taiji increases longevity…………. This is something that modern scientific research is starting to agree with. This longevity does not mean that you will live forever. What it does mean is that daily practice promotes a healthy body, clarity of mind, better balance, denser bones, better circulation, more balanced blood pressure, lower (more efficient) respiration, and a more efficient and active lymphatic system (assisting the immune system. The list goes on! One more thing that Taiji can do for you is that you smile more……… Great big smiles, that
come from deep within.

 

In the words of Aldous Huxley (from Island):

“No leaps, no high kicks, no running. The feet always firmly on the ground…movements intrinsically beautiful and at the same time charged with symbolic meaning. Thought taking shape in ritual and stylized gesture. The whole body transformed into a hieroglyph, a succession of hieroglyphs, of attitudes modulating from significance to significance, like a poem or a piece of music. Movements of the muscles representing movements of the consciousness…It’s meditation in action; the metaphysics of the Mahayana expressed not in words, but through symbolic movements and gestures.”

 

Therapist info

Taiji has great health benefits.

 

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Taiji, Taiji Quan & Neijia, Lanarkshire

San Bao Martial Arts School, Lanarkshire

T’ai-Chi London

Town & Village Tai Chi and Qigong is based in Carlisle but covers a large area within Northern Cumbria, running classes as far south as Shap and Penrith and as far north as Brampton.
 

 

Resources

Further information on Taiji including case studies, etc.

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Please note that Holistic-Pages.com makes no guarantee regarding the validity, efficacy, or safety of any therapy and we advise that medical advice should be sought from a qualified medical practitioner regarding any illness.
Holistic-Pages.com is not responsible for the credentials, qualifications and insurance status of any of the therapists who have links from this site and we advise that these should be checked before any treatment is undertaken.

 

 

Reiki of Dr Mikao Usui

Reiki

Reiki in action, ki transmition over the head.

The word reiki derives from the Japanese word reiki (meaning “mysterious atmosphere”), which was originally derive from the Chinese word língqì (“supernatural influence”). However, Reiki practitioners prefer to use “Universal Life Energy” as its translation.

Reiki is a system of natural healing which evolved in Japan from the experience and dedication of Dr Mikao Usui (d. 1926). Dr Usui, a Japanese doctor, developed or rediscovered Reiki towards the end of the 19th century while studying ancient Buddhist texts. He was inspired to develop this healing system from those teachings, spending many years of his life in study, research and meditation. Once Reiki was complete, he spent the rest of his life in the practising and teaching the system.

There are two main branches of Reiki, usually referred to as Traditional Japanese Reiki and Western Reiki. The main difference between them is that Westernised forms tend to use systematised hand-placements while the Japanese Reiki branches tend to have a more intuitive approach. Reiki has a three-tiered hierarchy of degrees, usually referred to as the First, Second, and Master/Teacher level, all of which are associated with different skills and techniques.

Reiki was introduced to the United States, in the 1970’s, by Hawaio Takata, a Japanese woman living in Hawaii. Takata having learned it from one of Usui’s pupils, Dr Chujiro Hayashi.

The Usui system of Reiki is a simple technique, using hands-on healing and sacred symbols that have been used for healing purposes for thousands of years. In using  Reiki techniques, the vitalizing, intrinsic force of Universal Life energy is channelled from the universe and transferred, through the hands, to various energy centres in the receiver’s body.

Reiki is said to intensify vibration of body molecules so that blockages that may cause disharmony and disease are released. It helps with all kinds of physical, mental, emotional or spiritual issues as Ki energy permeates the physical, mental, emotional, and several spiritual bodies and is fundamental to their development.

Reiki is a spiritual path (not a religion) as well as a form of healing that enhances the wellbeing of both the receiver and the giver.

During a Reiki session, the recipient remains clothed and usually lies on a couch and relaxes. The practitioner gently places their hands non-intrusively in a sequence of positions which cover the whole body. Being a holistic system, it is the whole person that is treated rather than any specific symptoms. A full treatment usually takes 1 to 1½ hours.

 

Therapist info

Reiki in action, ki transmition to the back.

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Carol Gough, Cardiff

Anita Levie, Stoke-on-Trent

Reiki South London

 

 

Resources

Further information on Reiki including case studies, etc.

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Please note that Holistic-Pages.com makes no guarantee regarding the validity, efficacy, or safety of any therapy and we advise that medical advice should be sought from a qualified medical practitioner regarding any illness.
Holistic-Pages.com is not responsible for the credentials, qualifications and insurance status of any of the therapists who have links from this site and we advise that these should be checked before any treatment is undertaken.

 

 

Qigong Basics, getting the most from Qigong

Qigong Basics

Qigong Basics - Qigong for health being practiced at sunset.

Qigong (pronounced Chi-Kung) is an ancient Chinese art for the promotion of health and, when written in Chinese, the word Qigong is comprised of two characters: Qi (anima, vital energy) and Gong (work, cultivation)…………… Qigong literally means energy work, or energy cultivation.  Before this work can be carried out effectively, the Qigong basics must be understood.

There are four main divisions of Qigong, and two methods.

Firstly, let us deal with the divisions of Qigong

  • Spiritual
  • Medical
  • Martial
  • Athletic

The choice of which method that is used is dependent on the goal of the practitioner. However, there is some overlap between the each of the methods.

 

Secondly, the two methods

  • Active qigong – Where physical movement is used to help the practitioner to guide the Qi.
  • Passive Qigong – Where there is no physical movement and it is purely the Yi (cognitive mind) that is used to guide the Qi.

The division of Qigong that we are dealing with here is Medical Qigong. This is a branch of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and according to TCM, Qi is life energy and the health of the body is reliant upon smooth, harmonious, flow of Qi within the body and disease is the result of poor Qi circulation and through Qigong it is possible to balance the flow of Qi allowing the body to heal itself.

The Qi is the intrinsic energy, the life force that we share with the rest of the natural world. Qi also refers to energy in the largest sense, it is the stuff of the universe, it is both matter and energy and link that bonds them together. Qi transcends and is not bounded by time or space.

Qigong works by using specific postures and movements of the body whilst combining them with focus (using directed breath) and intention. Through the use of these exercises, the Qi can be cultivated and replenished.

As previously stated, in the precept of Traditional Chinese Medicine is that all diseases are a result of blockage in the meridians (energy channels), causing obstructions and sluggishness in the flow of Qi. A person is healthy only when the Qi freely circulates through the meridians, nourishing all vital organs and tissues. The “Yellow Emperor’s Canon of Internal Medicine” (circa 250BC) states: “When the Qi is blocked, there is sickness. No blockage – no sickness”.

Literally thousands of styles of Qi Gong exist so it is a matter of finding the one that is suitable for your needs. Some styles are designed for general health and wellbeing and require daily practice. Other styles/exercises have specific therapeutic qualities and have been developed to treat specific ailments.

Qi Gong can be practiced by just about anyone, whether they are young or old, active, sedentary, or disabled.

Although there are many styles, they are founded on similar principles

  • A relaxed, grounded posture
  • A straight, supple spine
  • Breathing that uses the diaphragm
  • Fluid movement
  • Tranquil awareness

The quality of the Qi Gong practice is far more important than how often the practice is undertaken. Any aerobic exercise can be slowed down to the point where it appears, superficially, to resemble Qigong but as there is no intent, no focus and no guidance of the Qi, it is NOT Qigong.

It is far more beneficial to concentrate one or two styles, learning through experiential awareness than to learn many exercises superficially. It is vitally important to find a good Qigong teacher who has experience of Qi rather than experience of books.

 

Qigong Teachers

Qigong Basics - Painting rainbows,qigong style.

 

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Healing Qigong at Pro Holistic, Lanarkshire

San Bao Martial Arts School

 

Resources

Further information on Qigong including case studies, etc.

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Please note that Holistic-Pages.com makes no guarantee regarding the validity, efficacy, or safety of any therapy and we advise that medical advice should be sought from a qualified medical practitioner regarding any illness.
Holistic-Pages.com is not responsible for the credentials, qualifications and insurance status of any of the therapists who have links from this site and we advise that these should be checked before any treatment is undertaken.

 

 

Samuel Hahnemann – Homoeopathy

Homoeopathy

Samuel Hahnemann
The basic principle of homeopathy, known as the “law of similars”, is “let like be cured by like.” This was first stated by German physician Samuel Hahnemann in 1796.

 

Samuel Hahnemann

In 1790 while Hahnemann was studying the action of quinine, as a treatment of malaria, he experimented on himself by taking quinine even though he had no symptoms of malaria. This caused him to start exhibiting the classic symptoms of malaria even though he knew he was healthy. From this, he deducted that cinchona bark (the source of the quinine) could be useful in treating not only malaria, but other diseases that manifested similar symptoms. Following on from this discovery, Hahnemann went on to carry out further experiments further other common substances on his family and friends (ethics were different in those days). He discovered that by administering small doses of any substance whether it was of animal, plant or mineral origin, to a healthy person that it would cause symptoms that were discrete to the substance. Over time, he recorded his results and created a catalogue of remedies that would cause similar symptoms to many ailments.

Three main principles of homoeopathy are the law of similars, the infinitesimal dose, and the treatment of the whole person (holistic).

 

The Law Of Similars

Using the law of similar, homoeopathy uses substances that are capable of inducing similar (like) symptoms in a healthy person to treat those symptoms exhibited by the patient.

In the Organon, Hahnemann stated.. “All carefully conducted experimentation end research proved to us that persistent disease symptoms, far from being destroyed by opposite medicinal symptoms (in the conventional method), return instead with renewed intensity, after seeming for a short time to have improved”. (Organon, paragraph 23)

“Homoeopathy, by contrast, chooses from among ell the remedies whose actions upon the healthy have been established (proved), that one which has the power end propensity to produce all artificial disease conditions most similar to the natural one being treated”: (Organon, paragraph 24). This is the law of similars, being Similia Similibus Curentur, or “Let like be cured by like”.

 

The Infinitesimal Dose

“The highest ideal of therapy is to restore health … in the least harmful way”. (Organon, paragraph 2). When carrying out his initial testing, Hahnemann ‘s original experiments were designed to reduce the dose of the substance being given, while maintaining its therapeutic efficacy. What he discovered was that even infinitesimally small doses of the homoeopathic remedies were therapeutically effective. Additionally, at these minuscule doses they were completely safe and carried no risk of harmful side effects. Hahnemann
discovered that the potentised remedies not only retained the therapeutic effectiveness but were actually enhanced.

“When indicated, the smallest dose of a properly potentised medicine – in which calculation shows that there is only an infinitesimal amount of material substance left – exerts far more healing power than strong material doses of medicine”.

“This specific, invisible medicinal force of these highly potentised (homoeopathic) remedies does not depend on their material atoms, or on their physical surfaces, but depends on the invisible energy of the substance released and freed to the highest possible extent by progressive potentisation (dynamisation).” (Organon, paragraph 11)

 

The Whole Person

In treating a person homoeopathically, it is necessary to treat the person as a whole, rather than the disease that the person has.

Hahnemann stated: “In bringing about a cure the physician should consider the evident physical constitution of the patient (especially in chronic affections), his affective and intellectual character, his activities, his way of life, his habits, his social position, his family relationships, his age, his sexual life, etc”.

Conventional medicine is aimed at treating illnesses, but homoeopathy is holistic, and aims to treat the person rather than the symptoms. It is for this reason that homoeopathic treatment may require different medicines for different people suffering from the same disease.

 

Therapist info

Samuel Hahnemann - Homoeopathy

 

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Sensational Homeopathy

Shirley Harvey

 

Resources

Further information on Homoeopathy including case studies, etc.

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Please note that Holistic-Pages.com makes no guarantee regarding the validity, efficacy, or safety of any therapy and we advise that medical advice should be sought from a qualified medical practitioner regarding any illness.
Holistic-Pages.com is not responsible for the credentials, qualifications and insurance status of any of the therapists who have links from this site and we advise that these should be checked before any treatment is undertaken.

 

 

Self Shiatsu for headache relief

Self Shiatsu for headache relief

Did you know that you can use Self Shiatsu for headache relief? We all know what it is like to have a pounding headache.  Our usual response is to reach for the painkillers but what can we do when there are none at hand?  Well, one option open to us is to do some self Shiatsu and stimulate some, easily accessible and easily remembered, acupoints.

It is best that these are stimulated at the onset of the headache while you are able to focus on what you are doing rather than waiting until the headache is in full flow.

 

GB1diagram of GB meridian (Level with the eye corner, on the temple): Apply finger pressure and hold for 20 to 30 seconds.

GB14 (Above the middle of the eyebrow in the small groove that is halfway up the forehead):  Finger pressure and/or small massaging rotations for 20 to 30 seconds.

GB 12 (Below and behind the mastoid process): Apply finger pressure and hold for 20 to 30 seconds.

GB 20 (At the base of the skull, between the two large muscles [trapezius and the sternocleidomastoid]).  Apply finger pressure and hold for 20 to 30 seconds.

 

diagram of LI meridian

LI4 (Midway between the joint of the thumb and the index finger, and the border of the
web): Known as “The Great Eliminator” this point draws energy (qi) away from the head).  Apply thumb pressure and hold for 20 to 30 seconds.

 

 

 

The time quoted for stimulation is an approximation.  A good guide is that you hold the acupoint until any discomfort, from the finger pressure, starts to subside.

Easy to remember, easy to do, and all without ingesting chemicals.

A, simple, guided meditation

A, simple, guided meditation

I have used this guided meditation with many of my clients who, like many of us, suffer from the daily stress that life can bring.  It is not always possible to take time out (holidays) in order to get away from these stresses but respite can be found, along with increased energy, through simple meditation.

Initially used as a guided meditation,  it is an easy path to follow and soon the guide is no longer required.  A simple exercise that takes up little time yet has amazing results.  It is a real treasure.

  • It is a warm summer day, a perfect day.
  • You are in the terraced garden of large country house where there are people sitting, sunbathing or strolling.
  • It is peaceful and quiet – everyone here has come for a rest and are quietly appreciating the beautiful surroundings and you, like them, are listening to the bird song.
  • As you walk across the lawn you can feel the grass under your bare feet.  It is a comforting feeling.
  • Ahead of you, you see a broad stairway that leads down to the next terrace. There are seven stairs.
  • As you descend each of them you become more relaxed and your breathing becomes deeper and effortless.
  • This terrace is quieter, with fewer people.
  • As you walk across the grass, you become aware of a high wall that has ivy and honeysuckle growing on it.
  • You know this wall well.  It surrounds a secret garden and you have the only key.  It is your garden, your secret place, where you can sit in peace while you relax and recharge your batteries.
  • As you get closer, you can see your secret door.
  • Unlocking and opening the door, you enter a magical space with trees and plants of every kind.
  • The trees provide a canopy of shade with dappled sunlight beaming through.
  • You see your favourite tree and walk over to it, sitting down and resting your back against it.  It is like an old friend who brings feelings of warmth, comfort, and safety.
  • Sitting here, you feel the gentle spots of sunlight that have slipped through between the leaves, gently resting on your skin.
  • Can you feel these small areas of heat?
  • Each of these spots of sunshine contains a smile for you.  A smile that radiates through your whole body.
  • Allow yourself to spend some time here.
  • Feeling rested, you decide to walk deeper into the garden
  • With each step you feel lighter, more at home
  • You become more aware of the scent of the flowers, the colours, the shapes.
  • You hear the birds singing clearer than you have ever heard before.
  • You hear a buzzing and look over to see a honey bee moving from flower to flower.  We often think about busy bees and how they move from plant to plant, working away.  And often we think of ourselves moving through life in the same way, creating aims/goals and struggling to achieve them.  But, look again at the bee.  It is not frantic.  It looks almost aimless as it goes about its work.  It meanders through life but still reaches its goal – it makes honey and honey makes it content………….happy.  The flowers, in themselves, are not goals.  There are points that the bee passes through to achieve its happiness.
  • You hear yourself.  You hear your positive, happy inner thoughts.  Each of these is a treasure to be held on to, to be nurtured.
  • Take your time to explore the garden, yourself and your thoughts.  Feel the energy entering your body, mind and spirit.  Enjoy!
  • It is time to leave your secret garden now.  But it is always here for you and always easy to reach.  Remember, just across the lawn, down the seven steps to the quieter terrace and then a short walk to the door that only has one key.  Your key.
  • You are now leaving the garden, shutting the door behind you, and slowly walking back up the seven stairs that will bring you back into this room.

As you come back into the room, I want you to bring some movement back into your hands and feet by wiggling your fingers and toes.  Then, slowly, open your eyes.

Optimal Health Look after yourself

Look after yourself

To look after yourself and maintain optimal health and well-being you have to take some responsibility for your own health. You might like to consider some of the following.  These techniques cost very little in terms of money or time.

Water

Most people will improve their general health simply by drinking more water.  Good hydration encourages good drainage of the lymph system, and enables the body to excrete waste products and toxins out of the body cells more effectively; it enables nutrients to be more easily absorbed into the cells.

All the health and beauty magazines advise you to drink water.  Ideally a person should drink 25 ml per kilogram of body weight per day (so a 60 kg person should drink 60 x 25 ml = 1500ml or 1.5 litres per day).  This would increase the more physically active you are or depending on your work environment.  Bottled water is best.  Tap water is OK, but is full of chlorine, metals, antibiotics and hormones etc., and will become unpalatable once you are used to the real thing! Tea, coffee and fizzy drinks etc. are not utilised by the body in the same way.  Many of these drinks contain additives, preservatives, sweeteners or sugar that upset normal metabolism.

Yoga Exercises – for flexibility of body and mind.

By stretching the muscles and tissues of the body, energy flows more freely.  Ten or fifteen minutes of stretching in the morning is a great way to start the day, and the more often you do it, the better you’ll feel.

Always move gently from one position to the next and don’t over-stretch.  None of these exercises should cause pain or discomfort.

Salute to the sun

  1. Stand relaxed, feet together, hands together as if praying.
  2. Breathe in.  Stretch arms high above head, bending gently backwards.
  3. Breathe out.  Bend forwards, starting with the head bent, then the neck, upper back and lower back.  Arms hang loosely downwards towards the feet.  Feel each of the vertebrae stretching as you bend forwards.  Bend knees, if necessary, until your hands touch the floor.
  4. Breathe in.  Left leg moves back, right knee bends at right angles as if on the starting blocks for a race.  Head raised.
  5. Breathe out.  Hands on the floor, feet on the floor, lift bottom into the air making a right-angle at the waist.  Head drops down relaxed.
  6. Breathe in.  Lying flat on the floor, hands level with shoulders, push up so that your shoulders are off the floor while your hips are still touching the floor.  Head up.
  7. Breathe out.  Position (e), – bottom in the air.
  8. Breathe in.  Bring right leg forwards and go into Position (d) – starting blocks.
  9. Breathe out.  Position (c) – standing, bent over, hands hanging towards the floor.
  10. Breathe in.  Slowly stand up straight.  Stretch arms high above head, bending gently backwards – position (b).
  11. Breathe out and return to starting position, feet together, hands together as if praying.

Spine rotations and stretches

  1. Feet fixed firmly on the ground, legs shoulder width apart, knees slightly bent.  Keeping knees and hips facing forwards, rotate body first to the right, then to the left.  Allow relaxed arms to windmill around the body.  Turn the head and neck fully in direction of rotation. Repeat 15-30 times.  This helps to loosen up the spine.
  2. Feet apart, knees slightly bent.  Fold arms.  Bend forward, slowly flexing the neck, upper spine then lower spine.  Head down and dip gently in the middle 5 – 10 times.  Move your arms and body and dip to the left 5 – 10 times, to the right 5 – 10 times.  Finish off with 5 – 10 dips in the middle.  Notice how much further you can now bend.
  3. Stand with arms at sides.  Breathe in and lift arms forward and up above your head.  Breathe out and bring your arms backwards behind you and back to your sides.  Repeat 5 – 10 times.
  4. Keeping torso vertical, arms out to the sides, put one leg straight out behind you and bend the other knee in front of you.  Dip in the middle towards the ground 5 – 10 times.

Nutrition

We are what we eat.  Like the computer – garbage in = garbage out, i.e. no energy and no productivity.

Processed and refined foods are a poor source of nutrition.  If possible food should be freshly cooked.  Include plenty of fruit and vegetables and whole-wheat products rather than refined alternatives – (at least 50% of the diet should be raw foods).

Consider eating organic foods – we already have, on average, 500+ different pesticides in our bodies impairing our health!

Food combining is another option for some – by not mixing protein and carbohydrate at the same meal, some people feel more energetic.

Supplements such as antioxidants and fish oil are highly recommended to make up for the deficiencies in our diet today.

Your blood group may affect your ability to metabolise certain foods.  Type O tends to be intolerant of wheat and cow’s milk;  type A tends to be intolerant of red meats.

Meditation / Relaxation

There are many different meditation and relaxation techniques which you can use, e.g. the Silva technique, visualisation exercises, etc.  Do two 15 minute meditation or relaxation sessions a day to calm you down and replenish your energy.

Exercise with attitude

Don’t give yourself a hard time!  Whatever you do, enjoy it e.g. if you go running, don’t always make it a time trial.  Enjoy the fresh air.

Treat yourself well at bath and shower time.

Use aromatherapy oils in the bath.  In the shower, stand tall and be aware of your aura growing as you breathe in.  When you breathe out, let your stresses and worries go down the plughole.

Massage the tension out of your muscles and smooth out the worry lines in your face.

Language and self-talk

The way we talk to ourselves determines how we feel about ourselves.  Use positive language – “good”, “clever”, rather than negative language – “bad”, “stupid”.  If you make a mistake, rather than saying “I was stupid”, acknowledge it by saying, “that wasn’t very clever”.  Next time someone asks you how you feel, rather than saying, “not bad”,

try saying, “Pretty good thank you”.  If your not feeling good you can always say, “Could be better”.  See how different you feel using different expressions.  Use positive language with other people, especially your loved ones – they will feel better, and you will feel better.

Goals

It is important to have goals – to know what you really want for yourself.  You will feel more fulfilled if you know that you are doing what is right for you.  Your goal may be to be a nurse, it may be to work with children, it may be to start a charity for refugees, or to be a show-jumper, or to create beautiful gardens or it may be to be a mother (or father).  If you are on the path towards fulfilling your goal, life becomes a whole lot easier.

Complementary therapies

If you think you are getting really out of balance, e.g. feeling over-stressed and anxious, treat yourself to a massage, or Reiki, kinesiology, reflexology, aromatherapy etc. – they really help.

Your GP

See your GP if it is appropriate – if you have a sudden illness or unexplained pain.  Be good to yourself – if you are unwell, get treatment.