Tag Archives: five elements

Taiji Shibashi Qigong Course

Taiji Shibashi Qigong Course –  2016

The Tai Chi Chi Kung Shibashi (十八), or the eighteen postures of Tai Chi Chi Kung, is a set of Chi Kung exercises that utilise Tai Chi stances and adhere to the rules governing them. Although this set was brought together in the 1980’s the individual exercises themselves date back centuries, even millenia.

The Shibashi Chi Kung focus on health and well-being, directing and promoting the flow of chi through the meridians. Although each of them can be practiced individually, or in any variation, the set flows beautifully, from one posture to the next,producing a feeling of inner calmness and wellbeing.

The health benefits from the Shibashi become clear when they are practiced regularly and, in effect, you are being proactive with your health and wellbeing. The Shibashi are easy to learn and can easily be practiced in a restricted space where the Tai Chi forms would be impossible.

Feedback from previous workshops

  • Did the workshop meet your expectations? – 100% Yes.
  • Did the workshop cover the syllabus? – 100% Yes.
  • Were the methods taught useful? – 100% Yes.
  • Would you recommend this workshop? – 100% Yes.
  • Is there anything you would like to see added to the syllabus? “Perhaps guidlines about how best to practice with a view to building confidence to teach others” *This is included in the Instructor Course.

“Really enjoyed this workshop – couldn’t have been better, fantastic day and I feel like I learned an enormous amount and had fun doing it!”
“I really liked that the meridians were mentioned within the exercises and found this useful.”
“I felt very well lead throughout the exercises and supported – thought it was a great course.”

 

The Shibashi Qigong course is suitable for everyone including: –

  • Beginners
  • Tai Chi practitioners
  • Chi Kung practitioners
  • Reiki practitioners
  • Shiatsu practitioners
  • Physiotherapists
  • Rehabilitation therapists
  • Exercise instructors
  • Group leaders

This Shibashi Qigong course, which can be used towards our certificated Shibashi Instructor course, provides a firm grounding in the Tai Chi Shibashi Chi Kung system.

Shibashi Qigong course information: –

Dates: Jan 23rd, Feb 27th & March 26th  2016
Times: 10:00 till 17:00
Location: East Kilbride, South Lanarkshire
Cost: £70.00 per workshop, or £180.00 for the block of three.
Booking:  Pro-Holistic Taiji Shibashi Course

A deposit of £30.00 per workshop is required, with the balance to be paid on the first day of the course. Advanced booking is essential.

Further details of courses on Pro-Holistic Courses

This course is being provided by San Bao Martial Arts

Examples of Five Element Relationships in Traditional Chinese Medicine

Five Element Relationships in Traditional Chinese Medicine

In each example, the circled grey element is the Kyo and is therefore seen as the cause of the illness rather than the symptom.

Mother failing to nourish son.

In this case, treatment would be to: –

Five Element Relationships - Mother failing to nourish son

  1. Providing that the mother is not excessive, tonify the son then the mother.
  2. If the mother is excessive, sedate the mother and tonify the son.
  3. Alternatively, tonify the son and then tonify the controller of the mother.

 

Son taking too much from mother.

In this case, treatment would be: –Five Element Relationships - Son taking too much from mother

  1.  Sedate the excess (the son).
  2.  Tonify the mother.
  3. Tonify the controller of the son.

 

 

Controller exerting too much control.

In this case, treatment would be: –Five Element Relationships - Controller exerting too much control

  1. Sedate the excess element.
  2. Tonify the Controlled element.
  3. Tonify the Controller of the excess element.

 

Controlled element rebels against/insults the Controller.

In this case, treatment would be: –Five Element Relationships - Controlled element insults the Controller

  1. Sedate the Insulter.
  2. Tonify the Insulted.
  3. Tonify the Insulted’s parent

 

When using the Five Element theory it must be understood that the Kyo/Jitsu methodology of working is still valid – as Kyo/Jitsu are in an energetic relationship, you can find area of Kyo within an excessive (Jitsu) meridian, and areas of Kyo within a deficient (Kyo) meridian.  To confirm the relationship use palpation, treating and listening, and find the connection.

  • When treating a deficiency problem, look at the Sheng cycle to create/boost energy.  On the Sheng cycle, deficiencies occur when the parent is not feeding the child, or when the child is taking too much from the parent.
  • When treating excess, look at the Ko cycle

Diagnosis and Treatment

  1. Symptoms and observation.
  2. Diagnosis from Hara etc., using kyo and jitsu.
  3. Recognise the relationships between (a) and (b).
  4. Make up a composite diagnosis.
  5. Use Five Element theory to decide what meridians should be treated.
  6. Prepare treatment plan.
  7. Treat.
  8. Conclusions.

Example 1.

LI kyo – Inability to release.treatment plan 1

HT jitsu – Emotional problems.

Causes: –

Internalisation causing emotional problems, with an inability to let go.

Treatment:-

Tonify BL (Ko for HT).

Working down the body, tonify ST (Sheng for LI) and LI.

 

Example 2.

LV kyo – Control, planning, decision making.treatment plan 2

HG jitsu – Emotional protection.

Causes: –

Lack or over control, with an inability to make decisions, leading to emotional problems.

Treatment: –

Sedation of HG.

Tonify Water, KD (Sheng for LV) and BL (Ko for HG).

 

 

Acupuncture

Acupuncture

Acupuncture has been empirically proven effective in the treatment of specific ailments for more than 4,000 years, Acupuncture is a Chinese medical technique. Over the past few decades, Acupuncture has been scrutinised by the medical establishment and has been shown to work in a number of medical trials. It is used primarily for the relief of pain but also for curing disease and improving general health. Recent research – which included testing the thickness of the epidermis over the acupuncture points – has confirmed the location of these points.
Acupuncture consists of stimulating the Qi (intrinsic energy) by inserting hair-thin needles through the acupuncture points. These points generally lie on pathways called meridians although there are many non-meridian acupuncture points. The needles are typically inserted 1/10 to 4/10 inch (0.3 centimetre to 1 centimetre) deep, but some procedures require the needles to be inserted as deep as 10 inches (25 centimetres). The acupuncture points are then stimulated using various techniques. Traditional techniques such as by gentle twirling, or by applying heat. Or using more recently developed techniques such as stimulation with a weak electrical current. Acupuncture points also can be stimulated by pressure (acupressure, Tuina, or Shiatsu), and ultrasound. Recent developments have led to stimulation by the use of certain wavelengths of light.

According to the World Health Organization, diseases, symptoms or conditions for which acupuncture has been proved, through controlled trials, to be an effective treatment:

  • Adverse reactions to radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy
  • Allergic rhinitis (including hay fever)
  • Biliary colic
  • Depression (including depressive neurosis and depression following stroke)
  • Dysentery, acute bacillary
  • Dysmenorrhoea, primary
  • Epigastralgia, acute (in peptic ulcer, acute and chronic gastritis, and gastrospasm)
  • Facial pain (including craniomandibular disorders)
  • Headache
  • Hypertension, essential
  • Hypotension, primary
  • Induction of labour
  • Leukopenia
  • Low back pain
  • Malposition of fetus, correction of
  • Morning sickness
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Neck pain
  • Pain in dentistry (including dental pain and temporomandibular dysfunction)
  • Periarthritis of shoulder
  • Postoperative pain
  • Renal colic
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Sciatica
  • Sprain
  • Stroke
  • Tennis elbow

The depth of insertion of the needles is dependent upon the nature of the problem, the underlying anatomy of the points selected, the patient’s size, age, and constitution. Needles should always be of the sterilised, disposable variety thus absolutely assuring that there is no transmission of communicable disease from patient to patient due to contaminated needles.

Although acupuncture is the insertion of needles, there are other techniques and methods used by acupuncture therapists. The most commonly of these are moxibustion, which is the burning of the herb mugwort over the affected area to heat it, cupping, and electronic stimulation. Shiatsu, Acupressure, and Tuina Chinese remedial massage are also used.

Normally associated with Traditional Chinese Medicine, Acupuncture utilised the ancient Chinese theory of the Five Elements and the flow of Qi, (pronounced Chi, and meaning intrinsic energy) through discrete channels or meridians. The Qi in each meridian has a particular quality: Fire, Earth, Metal, Water, Wood. Illness is said to be the result of an imbalance or blockage in the flow of Qi through the meridians and Acupuncture is used to regulate the flow of Qi, increasing it in areas of deficiency and decreasing it in areas of excess –bringing balance to the whole body and inducing a harmonious flow of Qi.