Tag Archives: Taiji

Embroidered Brocade Qigong Courses – 2017

Embroidered Brocade Qigong is rooted in the principles of Taiji and is especially beneficial to Taiji players.  It takes around  20 –30 minutes to do the whole set.

Course date: Saturday 11th November 2017

Embroidered Brocade Qigong

Sequence:

  • Folding Over
  • Circle of Light
  • Catching a Ball (aka Billowing Sail)
  • The Five Elements (aka The Sun and the Moon)
  • The White Crane
  • The Snake
  • The Taiji Walk

Workshop details:

  • Location – East Kilbride, South Lanarkshire – location map
  • Dates – Saturday 14th May, and Saturday 26th November 2016
  • Time – 10.00 till 17:00
  • Cost – £60.00
  • Details – Focusing on posture, on learning Qigong, in depth, and gaining awareness of Qi flow.
  • Instructor – Des Lawton
  • Guidelines – Can be viewed here

For further datails and booking, visit Pro Holistic – Embroidered Brocade Qigong course

Taiji Shibashi (十八) Instructors course

Taiji Shibashi Instructors Course – 2017

The Taiji Qigong Shibashi (十八) Instructor course is designed to provide Qigong instructors with all the tools and information needed to teach the Shibashi as true Qigong.

The Shibashi (also known as the Eighteen Postures of Taiji Qigong) is a set of Qigong exercises based on Taiji that adheres to the rules governing Taiji stances (in particular, the Wuji stance). These stances are fundamentally important if the practitioner wishes to get the most out of the Qigong.

Since the early 1980′s, when the Shibashi was introduced, in, the significance of the Taiji stances has been lost and their true use as Qigong has been diminished and the beneficial qualities have depleted.  Without a solid base (root) there is a conflict of focus and the cognitive mind (Yi) cannot be fully focused on guiding the Qi.  This being the case, during the course a lot of time is spent on attaining and recognizing proper posture.

Testimonials:

  • “……………… just wanted to thank you for a wonderful weekend.  It was brilliant, I really enjoyed it.  I gained much more than I expected to.  Thanks for opening my eyes.”
  • “Attending this Workshop was a very motivational experience; an exercise of discovery providing a brief insight into the amazing power of QiGong. I would recommend this inspirational workshop to all who have an interest in QiGong”
  • “I discovered that qigong was more powerful than I had ever imagined.  An excellent weekend and I learned so much more about myself that can be brought into my classes, I now feel more confident that I can deliver qigong more effectively to my students and also enjoy the benefits for myself, thank you so much.”
  • “I am so glad that I made the decision to attend a truly inspirational workshop and to have benefited from an introduction to the amazing powers of QiGong. I am aware that we only experienced an ‘insight’ but even so I consider that I am now in a better position to pass on quality teaching to my students, and having been an FE Lecturer for many years, I believe delivering quality is of paramount importance.
    I also thank you (and your wife) for your hospitality in providing delicious lunches and snacks – greatly appreciated!”
  • “Just thought I should send you a wee message to let you know how much doing the Qigong instructors course has helped me personally. I had just started 4th year at Uni when I came on the course. Uni has been horrendous and a few times it has been bad enough to make me consider leaving but doing Qigong has been a life saver. It has got me through some very tough times.
    Big thank you to you for teaching me this beautiful art. Qigong had definitely came into my life at the right time.”
  • “Thanks des. Really exceeded expectations. Will take time to assimilate the information properly before introducing to my classes.”
  • “Really interesting weekend – it has inspired me to continue on my path for which I thank you so much.”
  • “Learning about Chi and feeling the Chi was an experience.”
  • “Thoroughly enjoyed the whole experience.”
  • “Thank you Des. Really enjoyed the workshop and your style of teaching the group.”
  • “Excellent instructor, easily understood, good analysis, some helpful tips and suggestions. Thank you.”
  • “Really interesting course. Made me want to learn more about he background and how move have different effects on the various parts of the body.”
  • “Felt better about the postures and learning to be aware about the postures.”
  • “This has been a truly wonderful course.”
  • “A brilliant training course.”

 

Next course: –

Dates: Jan 28th & 29th, Feb 25th, and April 1st & 2nd 2017
Times: 10:00 till 17:00
Location: East Kilbride, Lanarkshire
Cost: £360.00
Booking: Pro Holistic Taiji Shibashi Qigong Instructor Course

A deposit of £60.00 is required, with the balance to be paid on the first day of the course. As spaces are limited, advanced booking is essential.

 

Taiji Shibashi Qigong Course

Taiji Shibashi Qigong Course –  2016

The Tai Chi Chi Kung Shibashi (十八), or the eighteen postures of Tai Chi Chi Kung, is a set of Chi Kung exercises that utilise Tai Chi stances and adhere to the rules governing them. Although this set was brought together in the 1980’s the individual exercises themselves date back centuries, even millenia.

The Shibashi Chi Kung focus on health and well-being, directing and promoting the flow of chi through the meridians. Although each of them can be practiced individually, or in any variation, the set flows beautifully, from one posture to the next,producing a feeling of inner calmness and wellbeing.

The health benefits from the Shibashi become clear when they are practiced regularly and, in effect, you are being proactive with your health and wellbeing. The Shibashi are easy to learn and can easily be practiced in a restricted space where the Tai Chi forms would be impossible.

Feedback from previous workshops

  • Did the workshop meet your expectations? – 100% Yes.
  • Did the workshop cover the syllabus? – 100% Yes.
  • Were the methods taught useful? – 100% Yes.
  • Would you recommend this workshop? – 100% Yes.
  • Is there anything you would like to see added to the syllabus? “Perhaps guidlines about how best to practice with a view to building confidence to teach others” *This is included in the Instructor Course.

“Really enjoyed this workshop – couldn’t have been better, fantastic day and I feel like I learned an enormous amount and had fun doing it!”
“I really liked that the meridians were mentioned within the exercises and found this useful.”
“I felt very well lead throughout the exercises and supported – thought it was a great course.”

 

The Shibashi Qigong course is suitable for everyone including: –

  • Beginners
  • Tai Chi practitioners
  • Chi Kung practitioners
  • Reiki practitioners
  • Shiatsu practitioners
  • Physiotherapists
  • Rehabilitation therapists
  • Exercise instructors
  • Group leaders

This Shibashi Qigong course, which can be used towards our certificated Shibashi Instructor course, provides a firm grounding in the Tai Chi Shibashi Chi Kung system.

Shibashi Qigong course information: –

Dates: Jan 23rd, Feb 27th & March 26th  2016
Times: 10:00 till 17:00
Location: East Kilbride, South Lanarkshire
Cost: £70.00 per workshop, or £180.00 for the block of three.
Booking:  Pro-Holistic Taiji Shibashi Course

A deposit of £30.00 per workshop is required, with the balance to be paid on the first day of the course. Advanced booking is essential.

Further details of courses on Pro-Holistic Courses

This course is being provided by San Bao Martial Arts

Stress Management the Holistic Way

Stress Management

Stress management - stress can affect anyone, even the carers.

Stress management refers to a variety of techniques and psychotherapies that are designed to controlling stress levels within an individual, especially chronic stress.

We all know, or at least think we know, what stress is but even the professionals, who have spent their lives studying it, still have difficulty in exactly what stress is. Despite their efforts over the last half-century there is still no agreed definition yet we all know what stress is, in the same way that we all know what happiness is, but like happiness it has different qualities for different people.

Basically, stress is a term that describes our natural fight or flight response. Our primeval survival response that helped our species to continue existing. It is this inborn response that prepares us for fight or flight from anything that we perceive as dangerous, or a threat to our survival. And in the interests of our survival, this response is extremely sensitive and is set to recognise and react to even minute levels of potential danger, whether it is real or merely a perception.

In the 21st Century we may not be being chased by sabre-toothed tigers but this response to danger is still hard-wired into our system. Today’s modern stressors produce the same emotional and physical response but are brought on by a perceived imbalance between demands placed and what resources and time are available. They can be the result of fear of missing a deadline, of making a mistake in a tender, of not getting the job right, of redundancy, of not matching up to one’s peers…………… the list goes on. This means that you experience stress whenever you are faced with an event or situation that you perceive as challenging to your ability to cope. If you see the event or situation as only mildly challenging, you will probably feel only a little stress; however, if you perceive the situation or event as threatening or overwhelming your coping abilities, you will probably feel a lot of stress.

Is this, in itself bad? No, not really. Imagine the relief and sense of achievement of the caveman who has outrun the sabre-toothed tiger………….. Stress is a motivator and, on completion of a successful task, it can be rewarded and the stress levels drop to be replaced by a feeling of euphoria…………… However, it rarely works that way and one stressor can be piled on another until coping is no longer possible. Daily exposure to stressors can have negative consequences by causing hyper-vigilance or over-reaction during times when a state of calm awareness would be more productive. With daily exposure to these stressors, stress hormones can accumulate in the body and cause feelings of being burnt-out or depressed.

 

Effects of stress hormones

Stress hormones act by mobilizing energy from storage to muscles, increasing heart rate, blood pressure and breathing rate and shutting down metabolic processes such as digestion, reproduction, growth and immunity.

Constant stress causes continual release of various stress hormones which can cause:

  • High blood pressure
  • Stress-induced hypertension
  • Effects on metabolic processes
  • Lowered energy levels
  • Stomach ulcers
  • Decrease in testosterone levels in males
  • Irregular menstrual cycles in females
  • Lowered immune system

Research has shown that stress hormones are a major contributing factor in many major illnesses including cancer, heart disease and diabetes. Certain skin disorders, infections and psychological problems like generalised anxiety, panic, OCD, PTSD, depression, dissociative disorder, phobias and psychosis, have also been linked to cumulative stress.

 

Self-help methods of managing stress

  • Exercise – The easiest way to deal with cumulative stress is through physical exercise. During exercise, we metabolise excessive stress hormones and restore our body and mind to a calmer, more relaxed state. Even five to ten minutes of exercise, where a sweat has been worked up, will metabolise stress hormones and prevent their excessive  build-up. Exercise releases endorphins, which help us to feel better.
  • Taiji – Developed by the ancient Chinese, Taiji is one of the internal (soft) martial. It is increasingly practised in the West as a means of stress management and holistic exercise. Taiji is a series of slow, choreographed movements, or postures. At the core of Taiji is the concept of life essence, or Qi (pronounced ‘chee’), that flows, in meridians, through the body. When the flow of Qi is disrupted, illness is the result. Regular practice of Taiji is said to strengthen and improve Qi and according to scientific studies, Taiji is an effective healing tool for a range of disorders, particularly chronic (for example, arthritis and heart disease) and stress related conditions.
  • Qigong – Qi Gong is a combination of meditation and gentle, fluid, body movement with an emphasis on abdominal breathing. The, proper, practice of Qigong fills the mind to the point where there is no room for the stressors that permeate our daily lives. It is extremely difficult to empty our minds, our thoughts. The universe loves a vacuum and as we try to empty our mind, it takes the opportunity to fill it to overflowing. With Qigong the mind becomes full, full of one thing, the focus on the Qigong exercise. There is no room for anything else and this lets the practitioner step into the eye of the hurricane, to that calm spot where the stresses of life are absent. From there, these stresses can be observed with an air of detachment and life can be prioritised in a way that is beneficial to body, mind and spirit.
  • Meditation – It does not necessarily take years of meditation to combat stress. Meditation provides stillness and nourishment for our conscious (spirit) brain (cognitive mind) and. There are many types of meditation to choose from but they all share the understanding that the more you meditate, the lower the stress levels and the better you will feel. Zen meditation is particularly good for reducing stress levels.
    During Zen meditation, you become more accepting of your thoughts and feelings and how they relate to the world around you. This enables you to reassess your life, your goals and your relationship with the world, enabling your mind to become increasingly peaceful.

 

Therapist info

Stress management - stress can lead to poor, physical, health.

 

If you wish your website to be included on this page please see our Resources Page for details.

 

 

Pro Holistic Stress Management, Glasgow

 

 

Resources

Further information on Stress Management including case studies, etc.

If you wish to add further resource information about Stress Management please contact us with the details.

 

Please note that Holistic-Pages.com makes no guarantee regarding the validity, efficacy, or safety of any therapy and we advise that medical advice should be sought from a qualified medical practitioner regarding any illness.
Holistic-Pages.com is not responsible for the credentials, qualifications and insurance status of any of the therapists who have links from this site and we advise that these should be checked before any treatment is undertaken.

 

 

Treatment for Fibromyalgia

Treatment for Fibromyalgia

There are a number of holistic, natural, treatments available for Fibromyalgia. Here are some:

Complementary Treatment Options

Alleviating symptoms of fibromyalgia through the use of Shiatsu  and Qigong stretching exercises has shown promising results. Fibromyalgia reacts positively to the use of the gentle stretching and muscle manipulation, along with finger pressure on some of the trigger points (That are, coincidentally, located on acupuncture points).

Low impact aerobic exercises are also recommended, especially Taiji and Qigong as as they focus on posture and deep breathing and can lead to an increase energy levels.

There is an article on immunesupport.com that talks about the beneficial use of  Shiatsu in the treatment of fibromyalgia. Check out the link: Aches Define Life for Fibromyalgia Sufferers

Allopathic Treatment Options

At present, there is no cure and no specific treatment for fibromyalgia, but there are things that can help. There are drug regimes using a mixture of different drugs including painkillers and anti-inflammatory medication, and antidepressants to treat pain and any associated emotional problems.

Qigong (Chi Kung)

Qigong

Qigong (Chi Kung) is the art or science of using, working with and cultivating Qi ( Pronounced Chee and roughly translates as intrinsic life energy) to enrich one’s life by controlling and strengthening the flow of Qi throughout the body through exercises that focus the breath, the mind (Yi) and the Qi. It is not an art that can be learned from books, it must be experienced through practice under the guidance of a teacher.
This is an art that is steeped in Chinese history and whose benefits are still being discovered and appreciated by practitioners today.

Qigong exercises can be sub-divided into Passive Qigong and Active Qigong, and these can be further sub-divided into Medical, Martial and Spiritual Qigong.

  • Active Qigong is when there is body movement along with the movement of Qi – Shibashi exercises, Embroidered Brocade, etc.
  • Passive Qigong is when there is no body movement and the focus is purely on moving the Qi – Standing as a Tree, Standing as a Column.
  • Medical (health) Qigong promotes the smooth, free-flow of the Qi in the meridians. When there is a deficiency or stagnation of the Qi, this leads to illness. Qigong balances and harmonises the Qi, bringing health and vitality.
  • Martial Qigong packs Qi into the facia and organs. This is to strengthen the body so that it can withstand heavy blows, etc. The most famous of these is Iron Shirt.
  • Spiritual Qigong is used to alter states of awareness, giving access to higher levels of being.

Theoretically, Qigong follows the same rules as Acupuncture, Shiatsu, etc. in that it uses the concept of Yin and Yang, uses the meridian system and the exceptional vessels, and incorporates the Five Element Theory. The goal is to reduce excess and feed deficiency, reducing Yang conditions and increasing Yin conditions. Various techniques are utilised to facilitate the raising or lowering of the condition (Yin or Yang), to either cool or heat the Qi in order to achieve a particular result; healing the patient, or to act as prevention against illness.

By practising Qigong, the therapist/practitioner can increase their Qi capacity, and their ability to direct the Qi, so that the energy can be used during treatment. The therapist is also able to prescribe specific Qigong exercises to be used by the client in the healing process. For the healer to heal, he/she must first be healthy and have strong Qi. By the daily practice of Qigong, the therapist/practitioner remains in good health (the immune system is boosted and the endocrine system is more active). This health is not confined to the mere physical; it is health/balance of body, mind and spirit – Qi (intrinsic energy), Jing (sexual energy) and Shen (consciouness). The Qi affecting the physical, the Jing increasing and maintaining vigour, and the Shen affecting the consciousness, providing clarity of thought.

The practice of Qigong is mainly used to treat chronic ailments although it can also be used to treat acute conditions like aches and pains.