Tag Archives: chronic stress

Acupressure and Shiatsu Medical Trials

Acupressure and Shiatsu Medical Trials

In the interests of raising awareness of the effectiveness of Shiatsu and Acupressure, I have listed some of the acupressure and shiatsu medical trials that have been carried out.  If you know of any more I would appreciate it if you could add to the list.

The effects of acupressure on primary dysmenorrhea.

Effect of acupressure at the Sanyinjiao point on primary dysmenorrhea: a randomized controlled trial.

Acupressure to reduce labor pain: a randomized controlled trial.

[Effects of Nei-Guan acupressure on nausea, vomiting and level of satisfaction for gynecological surgery patients who are using a patient-controlled analgesia].

Effect of acupressure on thirst in hemodialysis patients.

Acupressure using ondansetron versus metoclopramide on reduction of postoperative nausea and vomiting after strabismus surgery.

A randomized clinical trial of the efficacy of applying a simple acupressure protocol to the Taichong point in relieving dysmenorrhea.

Effects of acupressure on menstrual distress in adolescent girls: a comparison between Hegu-Sanyinjiao matched points and Hegu, Zusanli single point.

Effects of SP6 acupressure on pain and menstrual distress in young women with dysmenorrhea.

Acupressure for primary dysmenorrhoea: a systematic review.

Cardiovascular benefits of acupressure (Jin Shin) following stroke.

Effectiveness of acupressure for residents of long-term care facilities with insomnia: a randomized controlled trial.

Complementary medicine for the management of chronic stress: superiority of active versus passive techniques.

Shiatsu as an adjuvant therapy for schizophrenia: an open-label pilot study.

Effects of Meridian acupressure for stroke patients in Korea.

The potential of complementary and alternative medicine in promoting well-being and critical health literacy: a prospective, observational study of shiatsu.

Stimulation of the wrist acupuncture point P6 for preventing postoperative nausea and vomiting.

Efficacy of wrists overnight compression (HT 7 point) on insomniacs: possible role of melatonin?

Efficacy of HT 7 point acupressure stimulation in the treatment of insomnia in cancer patients and in patients suffering from disorders other than cancer.

The effectiveness of shiatsu: findings from a cross-European, prospective observational study.

Cochrane systematic reviews examine P6 acupuncture-point stimulation for nausea and vomiting.

The effects of shiatsu on post-term pregnancy.

The use of motion sickness bands to control nausea and vomiting in a group of hospice patients.

Effects of SP6 acupressure on labor pain and length of delivery time in women during labor.

The effects of shiatsu: findings from a two-country exploratory study.

Continuous PC6 wristband acupressure for relief of nausea and vomiting associated with acute myocardial infarction: a partially randomised, placebo-controlled trial.

Acupoints massage in improving the quality of sleep and quality of life in patients with end-stage renal disease.

Stress at work

stress at workStress at work

Among the most common types of stress is good old-fashioned job stress, stress at work, and it is easy to understand why. With the economic slow-down of the last few years, employers are trying to squeeze more and more work out of their employees in order to keep the profits. Unfortunately, this is all too often the case with workers and people need to learn how to manage work stress. Otherwise, you will simply drown yourself in worry and drive yourself batty with concern over your workload and your job security.

The first thing to remember about job stress is that it really does not help you get work done. In fact, too much stress can actually prevent you from getting through your projects. Though every worker can point to a time when the chips were down and they rose to challenge, the fact is that long-term stress does not help people focus. Yes, short-term bursts of stress can heighten your ability to focus, but any period of stress that lasts longer than a day or even a few hours deteriorates your ability to focus. This is because the very hormones that heighten focus over a short period of time eventually degrade concentration and make you unable to keep your mind on the task at hand. Needless to say, this does not help you in the workplace.

One of the best ways to manage workplace stress is to take a break every so often. This means that you should give yourself a short break about every fifteen minutes or so and avail yourself of a break of a few minutes about every hour.
If you have the self-awareness to notice that you are not able to focus completely, you should give your eyes a break and take a quick stretch break in your chair. These breaks should be taken about every fifteen minutes, as they will allow your brain to recover a little bit of energy and allow you to return to the task at hand.

Additionally, every hour, stand up and walk away from your desk. This break should consist of some task not related to work or your desk and it is vital for maintaining concentration and reducing job stress. Go get a soft drink, take a restroom break, or simply walk the halls for about 3-5 minutes. This will not only give your body a break, it will provide your mind with an opportunity to relax. It is the simple act of doing something mindless that helps your mind. Just like muscles, the brain needs a rest and recovery period in order to get its strength back. Remember, you cannot remain completely focused forever, just like you cannot sprint forever.

If you do not take a break, your mind will start taking its own breaks. This is otherwise known as “having your mind wander.” This is a tremendously frustrating phenomenon and it can create severe job stress. You cannot focus, so you cannot get your work done, so you try to focus, which is causing your mind to wander simply because it has been focusing for so long. Thus, you become more frustrated with yourself and your stress increases. This is an endless spiral and, if you do not deliberately escape it, job stress will consume you until the only thing you can think about is your inability to think about anything other than your inability to get work done.
For those who are in the throes of job stress already and there does not seem to be any way to get out of it, it is time to give yourself a complete break. The best break is, of course, to go home and leave your work behind. However, this is not always feasible and, instead, you need some way to give yourself a break while not leaving your desk.

The best method for relieving job stress at your desk is to close your eyes and take deep breaths. The key to this is to avoid thinking about work while you are doing this breathing exercise. In fact, you should simply concentrate on your breathing. In essence, this is a form of meditation and it is a very good way to refresh your brainpower. This is because, when you are thinking about your breathing, you are thinking about almost nothing at all. After all, you breathe all the time and it comes pretty naturally. Thus, by concentrating on a process that is generally automatic, your mind will give itself a much-needed rest. In fact, some people are so effective at this form of meditation that they receive something akin to concentrated sleep. Though it takes a great deal of practice to achieve this much relaxation from meditation, even simple meditation can help you recover from job stress.

The most important thing to remember about job stress is to simply not worry about job stress. In fact, worrying about job stress will actually create a certain about of stress all its own. Thus, if you simply concentrate on your work, give yourself a break every so often, and give yourself a complete break when you need it, job stress does not need to be a concern.