Tag Archives: insomnia

Acupressure and Shiatsu Medical Trials

Acupressure and Shiatsu Medical Trials

In the interests of raising awareness of the effectiveness of Shiatsu and Acupressure, I have listed some of the acupressure and shiatsu medical trials that have been carried out.  If you know of any more I would appreciate it if you could add to the list.

The effects of acupressure on primary dysmenorrhea.

Effect of acupressure at the Sanyinjiao point on primary dysmenorrhea: a randomized controlled trial.

Acupressure to reduce labor pain: a randomized controlled trial.

[Effects of Nei-Guan acupressure on nausea, vomiting and level of satisfaction for gynecological surgery patients who are using a patient-controlled analgesia].

Effect of acupressure on thirst in hemodialysis patients.

Acupressure using ondansetron versus metoclopramide on reduction of postoperative nausea and vomiting after strabismus surgery.

A randomized clinical trial of the efficacy of applying a simple acupressure protocol to the Taichong point in relieving dysmenorrhea.

Effects of acupressure on menstrual distress in adolescent girls: a comparison between Hegu-Sanyinjiao matched points and Hegu, Zusanli single point.

Effects of SP6 acupressure on pain and menstrual distress in young women with dysmenorrhea.

Acupressure for primary dysmenorrhoea: a systematic review.

Cardiovascular benefits of acupressure (Jin Shin) following stroke.

Effectiveness of acupressure for residents of long-term care facilities with insomnia: a randomized controlled trial.

Complementary medicine for the management of chronic stress: superiority of active versus passive techniques.

Shiatsu as an adjuvant therapy for schizophrenia: an open-label pilot study.

Effects of Meridian acupressure for stroke patients in Korea.

The potential of complementary and alternative medicine in promoting well-being and critical health literacy: a prospective, observational study of shiatsu.

Stimulation of the wrist acupuncture point P6 for preventing postoperative nausea and vomiting.

Efficacy of wrists overnight compression (HT 7 point) on insomniacs: possible role of melatonin?

Efficacy of HT 7 point acupressure stimulation in the treatment of insomnia in cancer patients and in patients suffering from disorders other than cancer.

The effectiveness of shiatsu: findings from a cross-European, prospective observational study.

Cochrane systematic reviews examine P6 acupuncture-point stimulation for nausea and vomiting.

The effects of shiatsu on post-term pregnancy.

The use of motion sickness bands to control nausea and vomiting in a group of hospice patients.

Effects of SP6 acupressure on labor pain and length of delivery time in women during labor.

The effects of shiatsu: findings from a two-country exploratory study.

Continuous PC6 wristband acupressure for relief of nausea and vomiting associated with acute myocardial infarction: a partially randomised, placebo-controlled trial.

Acupoints massage in improving the quality of sleep and quality of life in patients with end-stage renal disease.

Hypnotherapy – What it is really about?

Hypnotherapy

Hypnotherapy and Hypnosis is widely used in the private health sector and to an increasing degree in the NHS. It is an effective, non-invasive treatment with few risks or side effects and is wholly holistic in its approach. Yet it is still very much misunderstood.

Although it is a natural state and can occur unprompted (daydreaming is a level of hypnosis), hypnosis, in the therapeutic setting, is best defined as an altered state of awareness usually induced in one person by another, where an individual remains responsive to suggestion.

Although hypnosis is said to resemble sleep the two states are in fact different. The two main distinguishing features can be shown using an EEG (electro encephalograph). Stage 1 sleep and hypnosis are difficult to distinguish, however stage 2, 3 and 4 of sleep are quite different in that there is an absence of delta waves in the hypnotic state which are present in stage 4 sleep. Secondly, the pattern given when a client experiences dreaming in an hypnotic sleep is the same as that of a client in the waking state however in sleep, the pattern in the dreaming state is quite different.

Hypnotherapy is a treatment procedure which utilises appropriate techniques with specific therapeutic goals. There are two essential components required for the successful induction of hypnosis.

  • Rapport between therapist and client.
  • Client motivation.

With both of these present about 90% of the population can be guided into the hypnotic state and contrary to popular belief, no one can be hypnotised against his or her will.

It is generally accepted that there are four levels of hypnosis with the number of people able to achieve each level lessening as the hypnotic state deepens.

The four levels of hypnosis are:

  1.  Hypnoidal – where relaxation can be experienced.
  2. Light hypnosis – limb catalepsy, diminished anxiety and sensory alteration are experienced.
  3. Medium depth hypnosis – here some analgesia can be experienced and there  is acceptance of post hypnotic suggestion.
  4. Deep hypnosis  or somnambulism – here, a  considerable analgesic effect can be experienced and there is profound acceptance of post hypnotic suggestions.

During hypnosis the conscious mind, which thinks and acts in the present, is least dominant while the subconscious mind is the most dominant and receptive part of the mind function.  The subconscious mind can undertake most of the functions of the conscious mind but it cannot take on the ability to criticise and as the dominant mind, the subconscious mind is much more open to, and accepting of suggestions given. It is important to understand however, that the client has total control over the session and will not accept suggestions against his/her will, moral code etc. Suggestions accepted in this state are accepted much more readily and acted upon much more powerfully because the ability to be critical and analytical is switched off.

This makes hypnosis a powerful therapeutic tool in the management of many health challenges. But for it’s therapeutic value, hypnosis would be no different from for example mediation or relaxation.

There are two principle methods of employing hypnosis therapeutically; symptom removal by suggestion and hypno-analysis. Symptom removal by suggestion is limited because it deals with effect rather than cause and is best applied when there is no psychological impact on the presenting problem. It can however be an effective tool in the management of pain control, the treatment of insomnia, aiding application to study and so on. Hypno-analysis on the other-hand delves deeper. It combines hypnosis with psychoanalysis and endeavours to pursue and find the cause of the problem. It is easier to bring this about when the subconscious mind is in control and the conscious, analytical mind is put to the side. With so many problems, if the cause is not reconciled, then the symptoms are likely to resurface. A comparison of the two techniques can be seen in the case of phobia. Suggestion therapy may help a client manage the fear through for example behavioural desensitisation or perhaps suggestions of relaxation. However, hypno-analysis would seek out the hidden triggering factor and deal with that, making it a more effective therapy for the client. Symptom removal by suggestion therefore has limitations. With hypno-analysis on the other-hand, in dealing with the originating source, there is likely to be a much longer lasting therapeutic effect.

Hypnotherapy is considered appropriate where: 

  • It is known to be effective in the management of the presenting problem.
  • The client is responsive to hypnotic induction.
  • There is rapport between therapist and client.
  • The client is motivated to resolve the presenting challenge.
  • The use of hypnotherapy would not have a detrimental effect on the client.

 

The format of a session is directed by the needs of the client, taking into account the character of the client and the presenting condition. It will generally consists of:

  • A holistic clinical assessment.
  • The hypnosis itself which consist generally of induction, deepening, visualisation, ego boosting, the application of appropriate techniques to provide the desired therapeutic effect, further ego boosting and or positive reinforcements and termination.
  • Post hypnotic discussion to answer any questions the client may have and the discussion regarding any follow-up treatments/care.

The number of sessions required varies from case to case and is determined by the needs and progress of the client in attaining the desired therapeutic goals.

Like many of the therapies labelled ‘complementary’ or alternative’, hypnotherapy has no formal regulation. It is up to individual practitioners to assess and evaluate the various training schools and the methods they employ, which associations they are affiliated to and what that body provides to both therapist and client. For example; Is there a code of conduct, including disciplinary procedures, What post graduate training is available, Is there a code of ethics, Does the body insist on or provide appropriate insurance for practice etc.?

Perhaps when the issues of streamlining training and setting up a regulated professional body have been resolved many of the myths surrounding hypnotherapy will be overcome, allowing more people to experience the benefits of the application of hypnotherapy as a treatment strategy.

Insomnia – pandemic and little understood

Insomnia

insomnia is debilitatingInsomnia is the inability to fall asleep and/or the ability to remain asleep for an adequate length of time to achieve quality rest. The results of insomnia are tiredness and fatigue that can negatively affect daily life. The condition may be transient, acute, or chronic.

 

Who Is Affected?

It affects both sexes and all age groups. Approximately 30-40% of the people are affected by disturbed sleep patterns, and in the region of 10% suffer from chronic insomnia. Although it is more common in women (especially on onset of menopause) and older adults.

Illness, psychiatric disorders, and working night or rotating shifts, all represent significant risks. About 40% of insomniacs also suffer from an associated psychiatric disorder, notably depression and insomnia is considered a diagnostic symptom for depressive and anxiety disorders.

What Are the Symptoms?

  • Difficulty falling asleep.
  • Disturbed, fragmented sleep.
  • Daytime fatigue and drowsiness.
  • Irritability.
  • Difficulty coping.

 

What can you do?

  • Cut down on caffeine (coffee, tea, cola, etc.).
  • Warm (not too hot) bath in subdued light……….. candle light does the trick.
  • Essential oil, such as lavender oil, in the bath water.
  • Set a regular pattern for bed time during the working week.

Treatment for Insomnia

Treatment for Insomnia

There are a number of holistic, natural, treatments available for Insomnia. Here are some:

Complementary Treatment Options

Shiatsu

Shiatsu has been found to be extremely beneficial in the treatment of insomnia, creating a feeling of deep relaxation and wellbeing. Shiatsu practitioners can work with conditions of both acute and chronic natures.

Qigong

The practice of appropriate Qigong exercises creates a feeling if inner calmness and tranquility that can help the practitioner to achieve quality sleep.

Herbal

Passionflower (Passiflora incarnata) is a strong relaxant and sedative that can be used without any ill effects. There are many commercially available tablets, for insomnia, that contain this herb.

Allopathic Treatment Options

  • Sleeping Pills.
  • Behavioural techniques, such as relaxation therapy, or sleep restriction therapy, to improve sleep patterns.