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Reflexology, the Ingham Method

Reflexology

Reflexology in action.

Reflexology is a form of therapy that involves applying pressure to specific reflex areas in the feet and hands which correspond to all of the glands, organs and parts of the body as well as the using massage techniques (effleurage) on the feet. Reflexology is based on the feet being a reflection of the body and, as a whole, corresponding with it. So, it is possible to find out which areas of the body are out of balance by working the feet. Treatment can also be given, via the feet, to stimulate the body’s own healing mechanism. The hands and ears also have similar reflex areas and can be used.

Reflexology traces its origin reaches back to 2330BC. In 1899 the Tomb of Ankhmahor, situated on the northern side of Teti’s pyramid at Saqqara, was excavated and some of the reliefs, on the walls, show that the ancient Egyptian physicians used a form
of reflexology. The tomb is more commonly known as the Physicain’s Tomb.

Modern Reflexology was pioneered, researched and developed in the 1930’s by Eunice Ingham. The Ingham Method is the leading method of Reflexology used throughout the world.

By stimulating the reflex points correctly, Reflexology can help many health problems in a natural way and can be used for preventative maintenance as well as reacting to any existing issues. However, the primary benefit of Reflexology is that the client can achieve a deep state of relaxation (the alpha state, where the brainwave pattern has slowed down).

 

Benefits of Reflexology:

  • Relieves stress and tension.
  • Improves circulation.
  • Increased relaxation.
  • Improve your energy
  • Reduces pain.
  • Reduces anxiety.
  • Improved sleep patterns.

 

A Reflexology session usually lasts about an hour. There is no need to get undressed as it is only the shoes and socks that are required to be removed. After a session, the client may become aware of the changes taking place as toxins are released, processed and eliminated from congested systems.

Therapist info

Reflexology chart.

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Gill Wah, Ross & Cromarty

Leeds Reflexology

Sonia Campos, Brighton

 

 

Resources

Further information on Reflexology including case studies, etc.

If you wish to add further resource information about Reflexology please contact us with the details.

 

Please note that Holistic-Pages.com makes no guarantee regarding the validity, efficacy, or safety of any therapy and we advise that medical advice should be sought from a qualified medical practitioner regarding any illness.
Holistic-Pages.com is not responsible for the credentials, qualifications and insurance status of any of the therapists who have links from this site and we advise that these should be checked before any treatment is undertaken.

 

 

Shiatsu in Hospitals – evidence of efficacy

In a film about Shiatsu in hospitals that was based on over 30,000 Shiatsu treatments in a number of Vienna hospitals, over a 15 year period, the following statements have been made by some of the doctors and clinicians who took part.

 

Doctor Volker Korbei – Gynaecologist

“The question is not Shiatsu or academic medicine. The answer for me is that Shiatsu should fit into normal medicine.   The new definition should be: Who can heal should heal.  Who can heal has to be embraced.  And shiatsu is right there.”

“If you need an artificial hip, a Shiatsu therapist cannot help you.  If you want to avoid the artificial hip you’re better off with a Shiatsu therapist.  There is a whole range of problems and diseases where conventional medicine should be promoted and there are problems and diseases, the ones that are left over, where we should be looking at other ways of treating.  There are other therapies but with Shiatsu you fare better, it’s cheaper and you attain better health and quality of life.”

 

Professor Doctor Heinz Kuderna – Surgery

“In this period 120 patients were treated.  Eighty percent of these patients really improved.  About half of the patients improved in a really convincing way that surpassed all our expectations.”

 

Doctor Ingrid Rapatz – Psychotherapist

“In my experience shiatsu is very intensive and it is perceived by the patients as very pleasant and beneficial.  What I hear very often and what I experienced myself, because I enjoyed shiatsu myself, is that Shiatsu creates a holistic sense of feeling better.”

 

Doctor Christian Korbl – Psychiatrist

“I have known about Hara Shiatsu for many years co-operating with Tomas Nelissen on a project with psychiatric in-patients. In the area of substance abuse, patients fond it most important to achieve relaxation and balance.  The benefit we noticed most quickly was improved sleep patterns.  We were able to reduce, noticeably, the amount of drugs.  This was noticed by the patients themselves.  For treating psychosomatic disorders Hara Shiatsu offers a completely new way to get to the root of the problem: through the body.  Patients with psychosomatic disorders often express conflict though the body, or the problem manifests in the body.”

 

Doctor Bernhard Kluger – Psychosomatic Medicine

“Before, our access was primarily through “psych” – namely psychotherapy.  The new additional possibilities that Shiatsu has opened up for us is a direct approach through the body.  It has opened a direct route to the children’s emotions through the body. “

 

The full video can be seen here

 

 

SHIATSU HEAD MASSAGE

When giving Shiatsu head massage, the giver sits/kneels at the head of the receiver.

  1. With the receiver lying in the supine position (face upwards), place both hands at the base of the skull and draw gently towards you (chin should tuck in slightly).
  2. Using the flat of your fingers, gently press in to GB20, noting the rate and depth of breathing and any other subtle movement in the musculature of the neck.
  3. Using your fingertips, start at the base of the neck and work up to the occiput making small circles at the level of each vertebra. Repeat three times noting any areas of tension and any difference between the left and right sides.
  4. With your fingers work on the Bladder meridian (one pair of acupoints at a time), 1 cun out from the spine, up as far as BL10 (just to the outside of the insertion point of trapezius muscle, under the occiput).
  5. Lift the head in both hands and rotate gently within their range of movement, taking note of any resistance or tension. Repeat in both directions.
  6. Cradling the head in one hand, turn it to one side and use finger/thumb pressure from GB20 (between trapezius & sternocleidomastoid under occiput) down the side of the neck to GB21 (top of trapezius). Repeat three times, staying longer on any tender or stiff points.
  7. Keeping the head anchored gently push the shoulder away to create a stretch on the neck.
  8. Squeeze down either side of the SCM muscle, again feeling the points and getting feedback about any referred pain. If such a point is found squeeze for five seconds then release.  Repeat until the pain lessens and then stretch the muscle.
  9. Turn the head to the other side and repeat steps 6-8.
  10. Centre the head and, using the thumb, stimulate the Governing Vessel points from between the eyebrows to the crown.
  11. With fingertips work Bladder meridian from BL2 (in the notch at the inside upper edge of the eye socket) 1 cun out from the mid-line.
  12. With flat of thumbs work along the forehead from centre to the temples, repeat three times, then stimulate TH23 at the outer edge of the eyebrow, and GB1 level with the outer corner of the eye just on the temple area. Both points good for headaches and tension.
  13. Work around the eye socket using finger pressure on the upper orbit and finger/thumb pressure on the lower orbit, making sure not to drag the skin.
  14. Massage in small circular movements at the temples.  The direction of the circles can be alternated.
  15. Using thumbs work down the sides of the nose, three times, and then stimulate LI 20 at the outside corner of the nostril.
  16. Using fingertips work along the underside of the cheekbone. Stimulate ST3 which is under the cheekbone and in line with the pupil of the eye (you need to hook your fingers slightly and pull back towards you).
  17. Work around the upper gum area, again being careful not to drag the skin, then squeezing top and bottom of the jaw from centre to outside edge.
  18. Make circular massage movements on the masseter muscle and press in on any tight parts.  This area holds a lot of tension and is involved in head pain and migraine.
  19. Gently take hold of the ears and pull up and down, backwards and forwards. Finish by pulling down on the ear lobes.
  20. The giver moves to kneel at the side of the receiver.  Then places one thumb or finger at the point between the eyebrows (the “Third Eye”) and the other at the Tandien (3 fingers width below the navel).  These points are held lightly for 10 seconds and then gently lifted off.

 

A, simple, guided meditation

A, simple, guided meditation

I have used this guided meditation with many of my clients who, like many of us, suffer from the daily stress that life can bring.  It is not always possible to take time out (holidays) in order to get away from these stresses but respite can be found, along with increased energy, through simple meditation.

Initially used as a guided meditation,  it is an easy path to follow and soon the guide is no longer required.  A simple exercise that takes up little time yet has amazing results.  It is a real treasure.

  • It is a warm summer day, a perfect day.
  • You are in the terraced garden of large country house where there are people sitting, sunbathing or strolling.
  • It is peaceful and quiet – everyone here has come for a rest and are quietly appreciating the beautiful surroundings and you, like them, are listening to the bird song.
  • As you walk across the lawn you can feel the grass under your bare feet.  It is a comforting feeling.
  • Ahead of you, you see a broad stairway that leads down to the next terrace. There are seven stairs.
  • As you descend each of them you become more relaxed and your breathing becomes deeper and effortless.
  • This terrace is quieter, with fewer people.
  • As you walk across the grass, you become aware of a high wall that has ivy and honeysuckle growing on it.
  • You know this wall well.  It surrounds a secret garden and you have the only key.  It is your garden, your secret place, where you can sit in peace while you relax and recharge your batteries.
  • As you get closer, you can see your secret door.
  • Unlocking and opening the door, you enter a magical space with trees and plants of every kind.
  • The trees provide a canopy of shade with dappled sunlight beaming through.
  • You see your favourite tree and walk over to it, sitting down and resting your back against it.  It is like an old friend who brings feelings of warmth, comfort, and safety.
  • Sitting here, you feel the gentle spots of sunlight that have slipped through between the leaves, gently resting on your skin.
  • Can you feel these small areas of heat?
  • Each of these spots of sunshine contains a smile for you.  A smile that radiates through your whole body.
  • Allow yourself to spend some time here.
  • Feeling rested, you decide to walk deeper into the garden
  • With each step you feel lighter, more at home
  • You become more aware of the scent of the flowers, the colours, the shapes.
  • You hear the birds singing clearer than you have ever heard before.
  • You hear a buzzing and look over to see a honey bee moving from flower to flower.  We often think about busy bees and how they move from plant to plant, working away.  And often we think of ourselves moving through life in the same way, creating aims/goals and struggling to achieve them.  But, look again at the bee.  It is not frantic.  It looks almost aimless as it goes about its work.  It meanders through life but still reaches its goal – it makes honey and honey makes it content………….happy.  The flowers, in themselves, are not goals.  There are points that the bee passes through to achieve its happiness.
  • You hear yourself.  You hear your positive, happy inner thoughts.  Each of these is a treasure to be held on to, to be nurtured.
  • Take your time to explore the garden, yourself and your thoughts.  Feel the energy entering your body, mind and spirit.  Enjoy!
  • It is time to leave your secret garden now.  But it is always here for you and always easy to reach.  Remember, just across the lawn, down the seven steps to the quieter terrace and then a short walk to the door that only has one key.  Your key.
  • You are now leaving the garden, shutting the door behind you, and slowly walking back up the seven stairs that will bring you back into this room.

As you come back into the room, I want you to bring some movement back into your hands and feet by wiggling your fingers and toes.  Then, slowly, open your eyes.

Optimal Health Look after yourself

Look after yourself

To look after yourself and maintain optimal health and well-being you have to take some responsibility for your own health. You might like to consider some of the following.  These techniques cost very little in terms of money or time.

Water

Most people will improve their general health simply by drinking more water.  Good hydration encourages good drainage of the lymph system, and enables the body to excrete waste products and toxins out of the body cells more effectively; it enables nutrients to be more easily absorbed into the cells.

All the health and beauty magazines advise you to drink water.  Ideally a person should drink 25 ml per kilogram of body weight per day (so a 60 kg person should drink 60 x 25 ml = 1500ml or 1.5 litres per day).  This would increase the more physically active you are or depending on your work environment.  Bottled water is best.  Tap water is OK, but is full of chlorine, metals, antibiotics and hormones etc., and will become unpalatable once you are used to the real thing! Tea, coffee and fizzy drinks etc. are not utilised by the body in the same way.  Many of these drinks contain additives, preservatives, sweeteners or sugar that upset normal metabolism.

Yoga Exercises – for flexibility of body and mind.

By stretching the muscles and tissues of the body, energy flows more freely.  Ten or fifteen minutes of stretching in the morning is a great way to start the day, and the more often you do it, the better you’ll feel.

Always move gently from one position to the next and don’t over-stretch.  None of these exercises should cause pain or discomfort.

Salute to the sun

  1. Stand relaxed, feet together, hands together as if praying.
  2. Breathe in.  Stretch arms high above head, bending gently backwards.
  3. Breathe out.  Bend forwards, starting with the head bent, then the neck, upper back and lower back.  Arms hang loosely downwards towards the feet.  Feel each of the vertebrae stretching as you bend forwards.  Bend knees, if necessary, until your hands touch the floor.
  4. Breathe in.  Left leg moves back, right knee bends at right angles as if on the starting blocks for a race.  Head raised.
  5. Breathe out.  Hands on the floor, feet on the floor, lift bottom into the air making a right-angle at the waist.  Head drops down relaxed.
  6. Breathe in.  Lying flat on the floor, hands level with shoulders, push up so that your shoulders are off the floor while your hips are still touching the floor.  Head up.
  7. Breathe out.  Position (e), – bottom in the air.
  8. Breathe in.  Bring right leg forwards and go into Position (d) – starting blocks.
  9. Breathe out.  Position (c) – standing, bent over, hands hanging towards the floor.
  10. Breathe in.  Slowly stand up straight.  Stretch arms high above head, bending gently backwards – position (b).
  11. Breathe out and return to starting position, feet together, hands together as if praying.

Spine rotations and stretches

  1. Feet fixed firmly on the ground, legs shoulder width apart, knees slightly bent.  Keeping knees and hips facing forwards, rotate body first to the right, then to the left.  Allow relaxed arms to windmill around the body.  Turn the head and neck fully in direction of rotation. Repeat 15-30 times.  This helps to loosen up the spine.
  2. Feet apart, knees slightly bent.  Fold arms.  Bend forward, slowly flexing the neck, upper spine then lower spine.  Head down and dip gently in the middle 5 – 10 times.  Move your arms and body and dip to the left 5 – 10 times, to the right 5 – 10 times.  Finish off with 5 – 10 dips in the middle.  Notice how much further you can now bend.
  3. Stand with arms at sides.  Breathe in and lift arms forward and up above your head.  Breathe out and bring your arms backwards behind you and back to your sides.  Repeat 5 – 10 times.
  4. Keeping torso vertical, arms out to the sides, put one leg straight out behind you and bend the other knee in front of you.  Dip in the middle towards the ground 5 – 10 times.

Nutrition

We are what we eat.  Like the computer – garbage in = garbage out, i.e. no energy and no productivity.

Processed and refined foods are a poor source of nutrition.  If possible food should be freshly cooked.  Include plenty of fruit and vegetables and whole-wheat products rather than refined alternatives – (at least 50% of the diet should be raw foods).

Consider eating organic foods – we already have, on average, 500+ different pesticides in our bodies impairing our health!

Food combining is another option for some – by not mixing protein and carbohydrate at the same meal, some people feel more energetic.

Supplements such as antioxidants and fish oil are highly recommended to make up for the deficiencies in our diet today.

Your blood group may affect your ability to metabolise certain foods.  Type O tends to be intolerant of wheat and cow’s milk;  type A tends to be intolerant of red meats.

Meditation / Relaxation

There are many different meditation and relaxation techniques which you can use, e.g. the Silva technique, visualisation exercises, etc.  Do two 15 minute meditation or relaxation sessions a day to calm you down and replenish your energy.

Exercise with attitude

Don’t give yourself a hard time!  Whatever you do, enjoy it e.g. if you go running, don’t always make it a time trial.  Enjoy the fresh air.

Treat yourself well at bath and shower time.

Use aromatherapy oils in the bath.  In the shower, stand tall and be aware of your aura growing as you breathe in.  When you breathe out, let your stresses and worries go down the plughole.

Massage the tension out of your muscles and smooth out the worry lines in your face.

Language and self-talk

The way we talk to ourselves determines how we feel about ourselves.  Use positive language – “good”, “clever”, rather than negative language – “bad”, “stupid”.  If you make a mistake, rather than saying “I was stupid”, acknowledge it by saying, “that wasn’t very clever”.  Next time someone asks you how you feel, rather than saying, “not bad”,

try saying, “Pretty good thank you”.  If your not feeling good you can always say, “Could be better”.  See how different you feel using different expressions.  Use positive language with other people, especially your loved ones – they will feel better, and you will feel better.

Goals

It is important to have goals – to know what you really want for yourself.  You will feel more fulfilled if you know that you are doing what is right for you.  Your goal may be to be a nurse, it may be to work with children, it may be to start a charity for refugees, or to be a show-jumper, or to create beautiful gardens or it may be to be a mother (or father).  If you are on the path towards fulfilling your goal, life becomes a whole lot easier.

Complementary therapies

If you think you are getting really out of balance, e.g. feeling over-stressed and anxious, treat yourself to a massage, or Reiki, kinesiology, reflexology, aromatherapy etc. – they really help.

Your GP

See your GP if it is appropriate – if you have a sudden illness or unexplained pain.  Be good to yourself – if you are unwell, get treatment.

Hypnotherapy – What it is really about?

Hypnotherapy

Hypnotherapy and Hypnosis is widely used in the private health sector and to an increasing degree in the NHS. It is an effective, non-invasive treatment with few risks or side effects and is wholly holistic in its approach. Yet it is still very much misunderstood.

Although it is a natural state and can occur unprompted (daydreaming is a level of hypnosis), hypnosis, in the therapeutic setting, is best defined as an altered state of awareness usually induced in one person by another, where an individual remains responsive to suggestion.

Although hypnosis is said to resemble sleep the two states are in fact different. The two main distinguishing features can be shown using an EEG (electro encephalograph). Stage 1 sleep and hypnosis are difficult to distinguish, however stage 2, 3 and 4 of sleep are quite different in that there is an absence of delta waves in the hypnotic state which are present in stage 4 sleep. Secondly, the pattern given when a client experiences dreaming in an hypnotic sleep is the same as that of a client in the waking state however in sleep, the pattern in the dreaming state is quite different.

Hypnotherapy is a treatment procedure which utilises appropriate techniques with specific therapeutic goals. There are two essential components required for the successful induction of hypnosis.

  • Rapport between therapist and client.
  • Client motivation.

With both of these present about 90% of the population can be guided into the hypnotic state and contrary to popular belief, no one can be hypnotised against his or her will.

It is generally accepted that there are four levels of hypnosis with the number of people able to achieve each level lessening as the hypnotic state deepens.

The four levels of hypnosis are:

  1.  Hypnoidal – where relaxation can be experienced.
  2. Light hypnosis – limb catalepsy, diminished anxiety and sensory alteration are experienced.
  3. Medium depth hypnosis – here some analgesia can be experienced and there  is acceptance of post hypnotic suggestion.
  4. Deep hypnosis  or somnambulism – here, a  considerable analgesic effect can be experienced and there is profound acceptance of post hypnotic suggestions.

During hypnosis the conscious mind, which thinks and acts in the present, is least dominant while the subconscious mind is the most dominant and receptive part of the mind function.  The subconscious mind can undertake most of the functions of the conscious mind but it cannot take on the ability to criticise and as the dominant mind, the subconscious mind is much more open to, and accepting of suggestions given. It is important to understand however, that the client has total control over the session and will not accept suggestions against his/her will, moral code etc. Suggestions accepted in this state are accepted much more readily and acted upon much more powerfully because the ability to be critical and analytical is switched off.

This makes hypnosis a powerful therapeutic tool in the management of many health challenges. But for it’s therapeutic value, hypnosis would be no different from for example mediation or relaxation.

There are two principle methods of employing hypnosis therapeutically; symptom removal by suggestion and hypno-analysis. Symptom removal by suggestion is limited because it deals with effect rather than cause and is best applied when there is no psychological impact on the presenting problem. It can however be an effective tool in the management of pain control, the treatment of insomnia, aiding application to study and so on. Hypno-analysis on the other-hand delves deeper. It combines hypnosis with psychoanalysis and endeavours to pursue and find the cause of the problem. It is easier to bring this about when the subconscious mind is in control and the conscious, analytical mind is put to the side. With so many problems, if the cause is not reconciled, then the symptoms are likely to resurface. A comparison of the two techniques can be seen in the case of phobia. Suggestion therapy may help a client manage the fear through for example behavioural desensitisation or perhaps suggestions of relaxation. However, hypno-analysis would seek out the hidden triggering factor and deal with that, making it a more effective therapy for the client. Symptom removal by suggestion therefore has limitations. With hypno-analysis on the other-hand, in dealing with the originating source, there is likely to be a much longer lasting therapeutic effect.

Hypnotherapy is considered appropriate where: 

  • It is known to be effective in the management of the presenting problem.
  • The client is responsive to hypnotic induction.
  • There is rapport between therapist and client.
  • The client is motivated to resolve the presenting challenge.
  • The use of hypnotherapy would not have a detrimental effect on the client.

 

The format of a session is directed by the needs of the client, taking into account the character of the client and the presenting condition. It will generally consists of:

  • A holistic clinical assessment.
  • The hypnosis itself which consist generally of induction, deepening, visualisation, ego boosting, the application of appropriate techniques to provide the desired therapeutic effect, further ego boosting and or positive reinforcements and termination.
  • Post hypnotic discussion to answer any questions the client may have and the discussion regarding any follow-up treatments/care.

The number of sessions required varies from case to case and is determined by the needs and progress of the client in attaining the desired therapeutic goals.

Like many of the therapies labelled ‘complementary’ or alternative’, hypnotherapy has no formal regulation. It is up to individual practitioners to assess and evaluate the various training schools and the methods they employ, which associations they are affiliated to and what that body provides to both therapist and client. For example; Is there a code of conduct, including disciplinary procedures, What post graduate training is available, Is there a code of ethics, Does the body insist on or provide appropriate insurance for practice etc.?

Perhaps when the issues of streamlining training and setting up a regulated professional body have been resolved many of the myths surrounding hypnotherapy will be overcome, allowing more people to experience the benefits of the application of hypnotherapy as a treatment strategy.

Slavic Massage

Slavic Massage

Slavic massage is one of the oldest, truest forms of classical aromatherapy left in existence.  Developed over hundreds of years from the times of Genghis Khan, this art spread from the plains at the base of the Altai Mountains and around the shores of lake Baikal, through the great horse nations of the Slavic people from Central Asia and Eastern Europe and carried by them to the West. Slavic massage was gradually developed by people living close to nature in a true wilderness, and used in the nurturing care of both humans and horses (horses being of paramount importance to them). This truly deeply relaxing and hypnotic massage is created by gentle stretches, smooth flowing rhythmical, circular, diagonal and figure-of-eight movements, combined with warm exotic oils. Slavic massage seems deceptively simple, but is highly effective.

It induces deep mental and physical relaxation, gently allowing the muscular system to de-stress and allowing the body to fully relax, allowing for an interchange of energies. The techniques used are safe and extremely pleasurable for both the giver and the receiver and may be the most relaxing massage you ever get.

The system was introduced into the UK by Jan Kusmirek who is one of the world’s leading Aromatherapists. Jan believes that the Slavic Massage is perfect for today’s desk-bound generation, a group in dire need of relief from the discomfort of sitting all day. This sedentary lifestyle puts pressure on the upper body ultimately causing stiffness in the joints, poor circulation and in some cases the onset of arthritis.

The benefits of this type of massage are multi-faceted, the physical effects on the circulation and lymphatic system of massage are well known. With Slavic Massage there is also a marked improvement in the micro circulation to all areas improving skin tone and nourishing tissue cells. Also the specific oils used in this particular massage increase the nutrition and lubrication to the skin leaving it with a healthy glow. The deep relaxation and gentle stretching involved in the treatment is ideal for easing out the joints and reducing discomfort, in particular elderly clients and those with arthritis.

Manual Lymphatic Drainage

Manual Lymphatic Drainage

Manual Lymphatic Drainage (MLD) uses gentle massage with the aim of promoting and regulating the circulation of the lymph. Lymph flows within the lymphatic system, the third circulatory system of the body.

The lymphatic system is formed by vessels and lymph nodes.  Unlike the cardiovascular system, the lymphatic system does not have a pump (in the case of the cardiovascular system, the heart is the pump) and it is totally dependent on the action of gravity and the expansion and contraction of the muscles to pump the lymph around the system.  Lymph is an interstitial liquid, surrounding both, the cells and each organ of the body.

The lymphatic system has multiple interrelated functions:

  • It is responsible for the removal of interstitial fluid from tissues.
  • It absorbs and transports fatty acids and fats as chyle to the circulatory system.
  • It transports immune cells to and from the lymph nodes in to the bones.
  • The lymph transports antigen-presenting cells (APCs) to the lymph nodes where an immune response is stimulated.

Lymphatic tissue is a specialized connective tissue that contains large quantities of lymphocytes.

The lymph, a physiological part of our body, brings to the cells the nutrition they require and removes any toxic elements and particles that are too large to be removed in the blood.

Manual Lymphatic Drainage stimulates and regulates this nutritional exchange between the lymph and the cells of the body by: –

  • Promoting the elimination of the toxins and the accumulated residues of the interstitial liquid.
  • Promoting the distribution of nutritive elements (particularly fats) within the cells.
  • Enhancing the body’s immune defenses by cleaning the lymph nodes of the accumulated residues, which lessen their natural defense activity.

Manual lymphatic drainage assists in the detoxification of the body, helping to re-establish It also produces a state of profound relaxation, therefore serving as an efficient aid in daily life and the stress inherent to it.

The Feldenkrais Method

The Feldenkrais Method

Named after its originator, Dr. Moshe Feldenkrais, D.Sc. (1904-1984), a Russian born physicist, mechanical engineer, judo expert and educator, the Feldenkrais Method is a type of somatic teaching that uses gentle movement with directed focus to improve human functioning and enhance movement. By using Feldenkrais, there can be improvements in flexibility and coordination, with an increase the ease and range of motion. The Feldenkrais Method aids in the rediscovery of the body’s capacity for flowing, efficient and natural movement. Through these improvements, the user often experiences an enhancement in other aspects of their life.

The Feldenkrais Method is founded on principles of physics, biomechanics and an empirical understanding of learning and human development. By expanding the self-image through particular movement sequences the practitioner can draw attention to aspects of the self that are outside normal awareness. The Feldenkrais Method enables the practitioner, through this heightened awareness, to include more of themselves in their daily movements. Practitioners become more aware of their habitual neuromuscular patterns, allowing them to lessen any rigidness while opening up their options for new ranges of movement.

Feldenkrais is accessible to all, whether young or old, physically challenged or physically fit, all of whom can benefit from its methods. It is especially valuable for anyone who suffers from chronic or acute pain of the back, neck, shoulder, hip, legs or knees, as well as for healthy individuals. It can also be very helpful in dealing with central nervous system conditions such as multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, and stroke.

Through lessons in Feldenkrais, you can enjoy greater ease and enjoyment of movement, an increased sense of vitality, and feelings of peaceful relaxation. After a session you often feel taller and lighter, breathe more freely and find that your discomforts have eased.

Treatment for Insomnia

Treatment for Insomnia

There are a number of holistic, natural, treatments available for Insomnia. Here are some:

Complementary Treatment Options

Shiatsu

Shiatsu has been found to be extremely beneficial in the treatment of insomnia, creating a feeling of deep relaxation and wellbeing. Shiatsu practitioners can work with conditions of both acute and chronic natures.

Qigong

The practice of appropriate Qigong exercises creates a feeling if inner calmness and tranquility that can help the practitioner to achieve quality sleep.

Herbal

Passionflower (Passiflora incarnata) is a strong relaxant and sedative that can be used without any ill effects. There are many commercially available tablets, for insomnia, that contain this herb.

Allopathic Treatment Options

  • Sleeping Pills.
  • Behavioural techniques, such as relaxation therapy, or sleep restriction therapy, to improve sleep patterns.