Tag Archives: shiatsu

Shiatsu of Namikoshi and Masunaga

Shiatsu

Shiatsu being applied to the Yu points.

Shiatsu (pronounced shee-at-soo, from shi, meaning finger, and atsu, meaning pressure), originated in Japan and was recognised, by the Japanese Government, as a separate and distinct therapy. The first known reference to shiatsu is thought to have been in the 1915 book, by Tenpaku Tamai, Shiatsu Ryoho.

According to the Japanese medical department of the Ministry of Welfare –  “Shiatsu technique refers to the use of fingers and palm of one’s hand to apply pressure to particular sections on the surface of the body for the purpose of correcting the imbalances of the body, and for maintaining and promoting health. It is also a method contributing to the healing of specific illnesses.” — December, 1957.

 

There are two main schools of Shiatsu: Namikoshi style and Masunaga (Zen) style.

 

Namikoshi Style

In 1940, Tokujiro Namikoshi founded the Japan Shiatsu College and systematised a form of shiatsu therapy based on Western anatomy and physiology. Namikoshi’s system of shiatsu is defined by the application of pressure using the fingers, palms the thumbs on points that are related to the central and autonomic nervous systems with the aim of preventing and curing illness by stimulating the body’s natural powers of recuperation and promoting general good health.

Diagnosis and treatment are combined with the hands and fingers of the therapists being sensitive enough to detect abnormalities in the skin or muscles, or body heat on contact, being able to pinpoint these irregularities and determine a treatment plan.

Holistic in nature, Namikoshi Shiatsu treats the whole body as well as focusing on any localised areas that require additional attention.

 

Masunaga, or Zen, Style

Zen Shiatsu was developed by Shizuto Masunaga (1925 – 1981) who was born into a family of Shiatsu practitioners. After graduating in Psychology from Kyoto University, he went on to graduate from the Japan Shiatsu College (1959) and went on to teach Psychology at there. Masunaga studied traditional shiatsu methods alongside the classic oriental medical texts, integrating these with western psychology. Masunaga went on to open his own Shiatsu school in Tokyo, the Iokai Shiatsu Centre. He integrated the traditional methods with western physiology, and went on to develop the extension of the classical meridians to cover the whole body along with a coherent theory to back his approach.

Masanuga, recognized extensions of the acupuncture channels in the arms and legs (known as the supplementary meridians). He thought that shiatsu should be holistic and involve the whole body. Zen Shiatsu requires the practitioner to be focused and sensitive to the Ki, and use both hands during treatment, the “mother” hand providing support and connection while the other hand treats by applying pressure to the tsubos (points).

In both styles the essence of shiatsu is that diagnosis and Treatment are combined.

Shiatsu was one of the eight disciplines named in the Collins Report adopted by the European Parliament in 1997 (European Parliament 1997) which called for steps to regulate complementary therapy practice.

 

Some of the conditions that respond well to Shiatsu:

  • Headaches
  • Migraine
  • Back Ache
  • Stiffness
  • Neck & Shoulder Pain
  • Panic Attacks
  • Palpitations
  • Stress
  • Digestive Disorders

Shiatsu is done at floor level on a futon mat. The recipient remains fully clothed and loose, comfortable, clothing preferably should be worn.

 

Therapist info

Shiatsu neck stretch technique.

If you wish your website to be included on this page please see our Resources Page for details.

 

 

 

Lifelines, Dingwall

Jane Harper, Cornwall

Pro Holistic Shiatsu, Lanarkshire Pro Holistic provide Shatsu, Sports Injury treatment, Stress Management & Qigong form their clinic in East Kilbride.

 

 

Resources

Further information on Shiatsu including case studies, etc.

If you wish to add further resource information about Shiatsu please contact us with the details.

 

Please note that Holistic-Pages.com makes no guarantee regarding the validity, efficacy, or safety of any therapy and we advise that medical advice should be sought from a qualified medical practitioner regarding any illness.
Holistic-Pages.com is not responsible for the credentials, qualifications and insurance status of any of the therapists who have links from this site and we advise that these should be checked before any treatment is undertaken.

Shiatsu in Hospitals – evidence of efficacy

In a film about Shiatsu in hospitals that was based on over 30,000 Shiatsu treatments in a number of Vienna hospitals, over a 15 year period, the following statements have been made by some of the doctors and clinicians who took part.

 

Doctor Volker Korbei – Gynaecologist

“The question is not Shiatsu or academic medicine. The answer for me is that Shiatsu should fit into normal medicine.   The new definition should be: Who can heal should heal.  Who can heal has to be embraced.  And shiatsu is right there.”

“If you need an artificial hip, a Shiatsu therapist cannot help you.  If you want to avoid the artificial hip you’re better off with a Shiatsu therapist.  There is a whole range of problems and diseases where conventional medicine should be promoted and there are problems and diseases, the ones that are left over, where we should be looking at other ways of treating.  There are other therapies but with Shiatsu you fare better, it’s cheaper and you attain better health and quality of life.”

 

Professor Doctor Heinz Kuderna – Surgery

“In this period 120 patients were treated.  Eighty percent of these patients really improved.  About half of the patients improved in a really convincing way that surpassed all our expectations.”

 

Doctor Ingrid Rapatz – Psychotherapist

“In my experience shiatsu is very intensive and it is perceived by the patients as very pleasant and beneficial.  What I hear very often and what I experienced myself, because I enjoyed shiatsu myself, is that Shiatsu creates a holistic sense of feeling better.”

 

Doctor Christian Korbl – Psychiatrist

“I have known about Hara Shiatsu for many years co-operating with Tomas Nelissen on a project with psychiatric in-patients. In the area of substance abuse, patients fond it most important to achieve relaxation and balance.  The benefit we noticed most quickly was improved sleep patterns.  We were able to reduce, noticeably, the amount of drugs.  This was noticed by the patients themselves.  For treating psychosomatic disorders Hara Shiatsu offers a completely new way to get to the root of the problem: through the body.  Patients with psychosomatic disorders often express conflict though the body, or the problem manifests in the body.”

 

Doctor Bernhard Kluger – Psychosomatic Medicine

“Before, our access was primarily through “psych” – namely psychotherapy.  The new additional possibilities that Shiatsu has opened up for us is a direct approach through the body.  It has opened a direct route to the children’s emotions through the body. “

 

The full video can be seen here

 

 

Self Shiatsu for headache relief

Self Shiatsu for headache relief

Did you know that you can use Self Shiatsu for headache relief? We all know what it is like to have a pounding headache.  Our usual response is to reach for the painkillers but what can we do when there are none at hand?  Well, one option open to us is to do some self Shiatsu and stimulate some, easily accessible and easily remembered, acupoints.

It is best that these are stimulated at the onset of the headache while you are able to focus on what you are doing rather than waiting until the headache is in full flow.

 

GB1diagram of GB meridian (Level with the eye corner, on the temple): Apply finger pressure and hold for 20 to 30 seconds.

GB14 (Above the middle of the eyebrow in the small groove that is halfway up the forehead):  Finger pressure and/or small massaging rotations for 20 to 30 seconds.

GB 12 (Below and behind the mastoid process): Apply finger pressure and hold for 20 to 30 seconds.

GB 20 (At the base of the skull, between the two large muscles [trapezius and the sternocleidomastoid]).  Apply finger pressure and hold for 20 to 30 seconds.

 

diagram of LI meridian

LI4 (Midway between the joint of the thumb and the index finger, and the border of the
web): Known as “The Great Eliminator” this point draws energy (qi) away from the head).  Apply thumb pressure and hold for 20 to 30 seconds.

 

 

 

The time quoted for stimulation is an approximation.  A good guide is that you hold the acupoint until any discomfort, from the finger pressure, starts to subside.

Easy to remember, easy to do, and all without ingesting chemicals.

Examples of Five Element Relationships in Traditional Chinese Medicine

Five Element Relationships in Traditional Chinese Medicine

In each example, the circled grey element is the Kyo and is therefore seen as the cause of the illness rather than the symptom.

Mother failing to nourish son.

In this case, treatment would be to: –

Five Element Relationships - Mother failing to nourish son

  1. Providing that the mother is not excessive, tonify the son then the mother.
  2. If the mother is excessive, sedate the mother and tonify the son.
  3. Alternatively, tonify the son and then tonify the controller of the mother.

 

Son taking too much from mother.

In this case, treatment would be: –Five Element Relationships - Son taking too much from mother

  1.  Sedate the excess (the son).
  2.  Tonify the mother.
  3. Tonify the controller of the son.

 

 

Controller exerting too much control.

In this case, treatment would be: –Five Element Relationships - Controller exerting too much control

  1. Sedate the excess element.
  2. Tonify the Controlled element.
  3. Tonify the Controller of the excess element.

 

Controlled element rebels against/insults the Controller.

In this case, treatment would be: –Five Element Relationships - Controlled element insults the Controller

  1. Sedate the Insulter.
  2. Tonify the Insulted.
  3. Tonify the Insulted’s parent

 

When using the Five Element theory it must be understood that the Kyo/Jitsu methodology of working is still valid – as Kyo/Jitsu are in an energetic relationship, you can find area of Kyo within an excessive (Jitsu) meridian, and areas of Kyo within a deficient (Kyo) meridian.  To confirm the relationship use palpation, treating and listening, and find the connection.

  • When treating a deficiency problem, look at the Sheng cycle to create/boost energy.  On the Sheng cycle, deficiencies occur when the parent is not feeding the child, or when the child is taking too much from the parent.
  • When treating excess, look at the Ko cycle

Diagnosis and Treatment

  1. Symptoms and observation.
  2. Diagnosis from Hara etc., using kyo and jitsu.
  3. Recognise the relationships between (a) and (b).
  4. Make up a composite diagnosis.
  5. Use Five Element theory to decide what meridians should be treated.
  6. Prepare treatment plan.
  7. Treat.
  8. Conclusions.

Example 1.

LI kyo – Inability to release.treatment plan 1

HT jitsu – Emotional problems.

Causes: –

Internalisation causing emotional problems, with an inability to let go.

Treatment:-

Tonify BL (Ko for HT).

Working down the body, tonify ST (Sheng for LI) and LI.

 

Example 2.

LV kyo – Control, planning, decision making.treatment plan 2

HG jitsu – Emotional protection.

Causes: –

Lack or over control, with an inability to make decisions, leading to emotional problems.

Treatment: –

Sedation of HG.

Tonify Water, KD (Sheng for LV) and BL (Ko for HG).

 

 

Comparison of Zen Shiatsu and Five Element Theory

Comparison of Zen Shiatsu and Five Element Theory

The central concept of Oriental Medicine is all physical disease is the result of disruption/obstruction in the flow of Qi (intrinsic energy).

Zen Shiatsu

 

zen shiatsu - masunaga shiatsu

Zen Shiatsu operates on the theory/concept of Kyo and Jitsu within the meridian system of the body.  The terms Kyo and Jitsu are used to describe the quality of the Qi in the meridians and acupoints.  Kyo means empty, depleted, or hypo and can be associated with the Chinese concept of Yin whereas Jitsu means full, in excess, or hyper and can be associated with Yang.

As with the Yin and Yang theory, Kyo and Jitsu are relative descriptions of Qi and one cannot exist without the other.  Kyo being the underlying cause of the illness and tends to be covert, while Jitsu is manifest as the effect and is generally overt.

When a diagnosis is carried out using Zen techniques (ie. Asking, listening, hearing and observing) on the Hara or the Yu points the object is to find the dynamic between the meridians and this is generally manifest as being between the most Kyo and most Jitsu meridians.  Once the diagnosis is complete the treatment is decided on, normally the Jitsu meridian is sedated and the Kyo meridian tonified.  The exception to this is when the patient is chronically Kyo in which case sedation is not carried out.

This method of working can also be carried out within a single meridian when, if the overall diagnosis of that meridian is Jitsu, any Kyo points can be tonified and filled by transferring the Qi from the Jitsu to the Kyo.  It a may also be found that there are Jitsu points within a predominantly Kyo meridian and, once again, the Qi can be transferred and balanced within that particular meridian.

Zen Shiatsu also has meridians which are supplementary to the TCM ones and Masunaga’s Shiatsu recognises twelve meridians in the arms and twelve in the legs.

 

Five Element Theory within Shiatsu

Five Element Theory - shen / ko diagram

Five Element Theory also works with the principal of empty (Yin) and full (Yang) points but expands the concept/theory of Yin and Yang so that there are defined qualities of Qi for each Element and the need to relate one quality with another (Yin needs Yang and vice versa) is gone.

The Five Elements (Qualities) are descriptive of the quality of Qi as it changes from Yin to Yang and then back.  It follows the cycle of Fire, Earth, Metal, Water and Wood……… then back to Fire.  Each meridian is associated with one of these Elements and as such it is placed in the cycle.  For example, the Metal Element is made up of the Lung and Large Intestine meridians.  This is further broken down within the Element and the meridian pair is split into Yin and Yang.  In the case of the Metal Element, Lung meridian is Yin while Large Intestine is Yang.

The Five Element system is made up of the creative, or Shen, cycle which works on a mother to son basis following the previously described cycle.  When using the Five Element Theory for treatment, three meridians are worked on (Triad).  There is also a control, or Ko, cycle in which one of the Elements has a direct controlling influence over the other: Fire – ko – Metal, Earth – ko – Water, Metal – ko – Wood, Water – ko – Fire, Wood – ko – Earth.

On the Shen cycle, Yang feeds Yang and Yin feeds Yin.  On the Ko cycle Yang controls Yin and Yin controls Yang.

Once a diagnosis has been completed the associations between the symptoms/observations and the diagnosis are noted.  A composite diagnosis is then carried out, the meridians that are to be worked are decided, a plan of treatment is decided and, finally, the treatment is carried out.  On the face of it, The Five Element system appears to be much more complex but it is really straight forward.  It also strengthens the treatment by having a third meridian assist in the rebalancing of the other two.

Examples

  1. If you took the example of someone who was found to be LU Jitsu and KD Kyo, using Zen Theory you would simply sedate LU and tonify KD.  However, using Five Element Theory you could sedate LU, tonify KD and tonify SI, or TH, using the Ko cycle to control LU.
  2. Another example could be of a client who showed KD Jitsu and LU Kyo (the opposite of the previous example).  Using Zen Theory it would be a case of sedating KD and tonifying LU.  If Five Element Theory was used you could sedate KD, tonify LU and tonify ST, utilising the Ko cycle to control KD.If, for example, the client was chronically Kyo and alternative treatment plan (using the Five Element Theory) would be to leave KD, tonify ST to control KD, tonify LU and, lastly, tonify SP to bolster LU through the Shen cycle.

There is compatibility between the two systems that can be seen when using the Five Element treatment method.  If you find Jitsu within a Kyo meridian you can simply use Zen Theory to move Qi from one part of the meridian to another.

SHIATSU HEAD MASSAGE

When giving Shiatsu head massage, the giver sits/kneels at the head of the receiver.

  1. With the receiver lying in the supine position (face upwards), place both hands at the base of the skull and draw gently towards you (chin should tuck in slightly).
  2. Using the flat of your fingers, gently press in to GB20, noting the rate and depth of breathing and any other subtle movement in the musculature of the neck.
  3. Using your fingertips, start at the base of the neck and work up to the occiput making small circles at the level of each vertebra. Repeat three times noting any areas of tension and any difference between the left and right sides.
  4. With your fingers work on the Bladder meridian (one pair of acupoints at a time), 1 cun out from the spine, up as far as BL10 (just to the outside of the insertion point of trapezius muscle, under the occiput).
  5. Lift the head in both hands and rotate gently within their range of movement, taking note of any resistance or tension. Repeat in both directions.
  6. Cradling the head in one hand, turn it to one side and use finger/thumb pressure from GB20 (between trapezius & sternocleidomastoid under occiput) down the side of the neck to GB21 (top of trapezius). Repeat three times, staying longer on any tender or stiff points.
  7. Keeping the head anchored gently push the shoulder away to create a stretch on the neck.
  8. Squeeze down either side of the SCM muscle, again feeling the points and getting feedback about any referred pain. If such a point is found squeeze for five seconds then release.  Repeat until the pain lessens and then stretch the muscle.
  9. Turn the head to the other side and repeat steps 6-8.
  10. Centre the head and, using the thumb, stimulate the Governing Vessel points from between the eyebrows to the crown.
  11. With fingertips work Bladder meridian from BL2 (in the notch at the inside upper edge of the eye socket) 1 cun out from the mid-line.
  12. With flat of thumbs work along the forehead from centre to the temples, repeat three times, then stimulate TH23 at the outer edge of the eyebrow, and GB1 level with the outer corner of the eye just on the temple area. Both points good for headaches and tension.
  13. Work around the eye socket using finger pressure on the upper orbit and finger/thumb pressure on the lower orbit, making sure not to drag the skin.
  14. Massage in small circular movements at the temples.  The direction of the circles can be alternated.
  15. Using thumbs work down the sides of the nose, three times, and then stimulate LI 20 at the outside corner of the nostril.
  16. Using fingertips work along the underside of the cheekbone. Stimulate ST3 which is under the cheekbone and in line with the pupil of the eye (you need to hook your fingers slightly and pull back towards you).
  17. Work around the upper gum area, again being careful not to drag the skin, then squeezing top and bottom of the jaw from centre to outside edge.
  18. Make circular massage movements on the masseter muscle and press in on any tight parts.  This area holds a lot of tension and is involved in head pain and migraine.
  19. Gently take hold of the ears and pull up and down, backwards and forwards. Finish by pulling down on the ear lobes.
  20. The giver moves to kneel at the side of the receiver.  Then places one thumb or finger at the point between the eyebrows (the “Third Eye”) and the other at the Tandien (3 fingers width below the navel).  These points are held lightly for 10 seconds and then gently lifted off.

 

Optimal Health Look after yourself

Look after yourself

To look after yourself and maintain optimal health and well-being you have to take some responsibility for your own health. You might like to consider some of the following.  These techniques cost very little in terms of money or time.

Water

Most people will improve their general health simply by drinking more water.  Good hydration encourages good drainage of the lymph system, and enables the body to excrete waste products and toxins out of the body cells more effectively; it enables nutrients to be more easily absorbed into the cells.

All the health and beauty magazines advise you to drink water.  Ideally a person should drink 25 ml per kilogram of body weight per day (so a 60 kg person should drink 60 x 25 ml = 1500ml or 1.5 litres per day).  This would increase the more physically active you are or depending on your work environment.  Bottled water is best.  Tap water is OK, but is full of chlorine, metals, antibiotics and hormones etc., and will become unpalatable once you are used to the real thing! Tea, coffee and fizzy drinks etc. are not utilised by the body in the same way.  Many of these drinks contain additives, preservatives, sweeteners or sugar that upset normal metabolism.

Yoga Exercises – for flexibility of body and mind.

By stretching the muscles and tissues of the body, energy flows more freely.  Ten or fifteen minutes of stretching in the morning is a great way to start the day, and the more often you do it, the better you’ll feel.

Always move gently from one position to the next and don’t over-stretch.  None of these exercises should cause pain or discomfort.

Salute to the sun

  1. Stand relaxed, feet together, hands together as if praying.
  2. Breathe in.  Stretch arms high above head, bending gently backwards.
  3. Breathe out.  Bend forwards, starting with the head bent, then the neck, upper back and lower back.  Arms hang loosely downwards towards the feet.  Feel each of the vertebrae stretching as you bend forwards.  Bend knees, if necessary, until your hands touch the floor.
  4. Breathe in.  Left leg moves back, right knee bends at right angles as if on the starting blocks for a race.  Head raised.
  5. Breathe out.  Hands on the floor, feet on the floor, lift bottom into the air making a right-angle at the waist.  Head drops down relaxed.
  6. Breathe in.  Lying flat on the floor, hands level with shoulders, push up so that your shoulders are off the floor while your hips are still touching the floor.  Head up.
  7. Breathe out.  Position (e), – bottom in the air.
  8. Breathe in.  Bring right leg forwards and go into Position (d) – starting blocks.
  9. Breathe out.  Position (c) – standing, bent over, hands hanging towards the floor.
  10. Breathe in.  Slowly stand up straight.  Stretch arms high above head, bending gently backwards – position (b).
  11. Breathe out and return to starting position, feet together, hands together as if praying.

Spine rotations and stretches

  1. Feet fixed firmly on the ground, legs shoulder width apart, knees slightly bent.  Keeping knees and hips facing forwards, rotate body first to the right, then to the left.  Allow relaxed arms to windmill around the body.  Turn the head and neck fully in direction of rotation. Repeat 15-30 times.  This helps to loosen up the spine.
  2. Feet apart, knees slightly bent.  Fold arms.  Bend forward, slowly flexing the neck, upper spine then lower spine.  Head down and dip gently in the middle 5 – 10 times.  Move your arms and body and dip to the left 5 – 10 times, to the right 5 – 10 times.  Finish off with 5 – 10 dips in the middle.  Notice how much further you can now bend.
  3. Stand with arms at sides.  Breathe in and lift arms forward and up above your head.  Breathe out and bring your arms backwards behind you and back to your sides.  Repeat 5 – 10 times.
  4. Keeping torso vertical, arms out to the sides, put one leg straight out behind you and bend the other knee in front of you.  Dip in the middle towards the ground 5 – 10 times.

Nutrition

We are what we eat.  Like the computer – garbage in = garbage out, i.e. no energy and no productivity.

Processed and refined foods are a poor source of nutrition.  If possible food should be freshly cooked.  Include plenty of fruit and vegetables and whole-wheat products rather than refined alternatives – (at least 50% of the diet should be raw foods).

Consider eating organic foods – we already have, on average, 500+ different pesticides in our bodies impairing our health!

Food combining is another option for some – by not mixing protein and carbohydrate at the same meal, some people feel more energetic.

Supplements such as antioxidants and fish oil are highly recommended to make up for the deficiencies in our diet today.

Your blood group may affect your ability to metabolise certain foods.  Type O tends to be intolerant of wheat and cow’s milk;  type A tends to be intolerant of red meats.

Meditation / Relaxation

There are many different meditation and relaxation techniques which you can use, e.g. the Silva technique, visualisation exercises, etc.  Do two 15 minute meditation or relaxation sessions a day to calm you down and replenish your energy.

Exercise with attitude

Don’t give yourself a hard time!  Whatever you do, enjoy it e.g. if you go running, don’t always make it a time trial.  Enjoy the fresh air.

Treat yourself well at bath and shower time.

Use aromatherapy oils in the bath.  In the shower, stand tall and be aware of your aura growing as you breathe in.  When you breathe out, let your stresses and worries go down the plughole.

Massage the tension out of your muscles and smooth out the worry lines in your face.

Language and self-talk

The way we talk to ourselves determines how we feel about ourselves.  Use positive language – “good”, “clever”, rather than negative language – “bad”, “stupid”.  If you make a mistake, rather than saying “I was stupid”, acknowledge it by saying, “that wasn’t very clever”.  Next time someone asks you how you feel, rather than saying, “not bad”,

try saying, “Pretty good thank you”.  If your not feeling good you can always say, “Could be better”.  See how different you feel using different expressions.  Use positive language with other people, especially your loved ones – they will feel better, and you will feel better.

Goals

It is important to have goals – to know what you really want for yourself.  You will feel more fulfilled if you know that you are doing what is right for you.  Your goal may be to be a nurse, it may be to work with children, it may be to start a charity for refugees, or to be a show-jumper, or to create beautiful gardens or it may be to be a mother (or father).  If you are on the path towards fulfilling your goal, life becomes a whole lot easier.

Complementary therapies

If you think you are getting really out of balance, e.g. feeling over-stressed and anxious, treat yourself to a massage, or Reiki, kinesiology, reflexology, aromatherapy etc. – they really help.

Your GP

See your GP if it is appropriate – if you have a sudden illness or unexplained pain.  Be good to yourself – if you are unwell, get treatment.

Acupressure and Shiatsu Medical Trials

Acupressure and Shiatsu Medical Trials

In the interests of raising awareness of the effectiveness of Shiatsu and Acupressure, I have listed some of the acupressure and shiatsu medical trials that have been carried out.  If you know of any more I would appreciate it if you could add to the list.

The effects of acupressure on primary dysmenorrhea.

Effect of acupressure at the Sanyinjiao point on primary dysmenorrhea: a randomized controlled trial.

Acupressure to reduce labor pain: a randomized controlled trial.

[Effects of Nei-Guan acupressure on nausea, vomiting and level of satisfaction for gynecological surgery patients who are using a patient-controlled analgesia].

Effect of acupressure on thirst in hemodialysis patients.

Acupressure using ondansetron versus metoclopramide on reduction of postoperative nausea and vomiting after strabismus surgery.

A randomized clinical trial of the efficacy of applying a simple acupressure protocol to the Taichong point in relieving dysmenorrhea.

Effects of acupressure on menstrual distress in adolescent girls: a comparison between Hegu-Sanyinjiao matched points and Hegu, Zusanli single point.

Effects of SP6 acupressure on pain and menstrual distress in young women with dysmenorrhea.

Acupressure for primary dysmenorrhoea: a systematic review.

Cardiovascular benefits of acupressure (Jin Shin) following stroke.

Effectiveness of acupressure for residents of long-term care facilities with insomnia: a randomized controlled trial.

Complementary medicine for the management of chronic stress: superiority of active versus passive techniques.

Shiatsu as an adjuvant therapy for schizophrenia: an open-label pilot study.

Effects of Meridian acupressure for stroke patients in Korea.

The potential of complementary and alternative medicine in promoting well-being and critical health literacy: a prospective, observational study of shiatsu.

Stimulation of the wrist acupuncture point P6 for preventing postoperative nausea and vomiting.

Efficacy of wrists overnight compression (HT 7 point) on insomniacs: possible role of melatonin?

Efficacy of HT 7 point acupressure stimulation in the treatment of insomnia in cancer patients and in patients suffering from disorders other than cancer.

The effectiveness of shiatsu: findings from a cross-European, prospective observational study.

Cochrane systematic reviews examine P6 acupuncture-point stimulation for nausea and vomiting.

The effects of shiatsu on post-term pregnancy.

The use of motion sickness bands to control nausea and vomiting in a group of hospice patients.

Effects of SP6 acupressure on labor pain and length of delivery time in women during labor.

The effects of shiatsu: findings from a two-country exploratory study.

Continuous PC6 wristband acupressure for relief of nausea and vomiting associated with acute myocardial infarction: a partially randomised, placebo-controlled trial.

Acupoints massage in improving the quality of sleep and quality of life in patients with end-stage renal disease.

Shiatsu Bodywork

Shiatsu Bodywork

Shiatsu has its roots in the Chinese healing systems. It was later adopted and developed by the Japanese after the introduction of Chen (Zen) Buddhism, aspects of Chinese philosophy and culture, and Chinese medicine into Japan in the Sixth Century.  It incorporates a meditative approach to the healing process where the practitioner, through experience and with the proper training cultivates sensitivity to the movement of Ki by increasing his/her listening skill.

Zen Shiatsu bodywork is used to treat chronic ailments as well as promoting health, wellbeing and the ability to fight off illness.  Treatment consists of two main tools, sedation and tonification of the meridians and points. With sedation the object is to prepare the Ki for movement, and this is done through a series of joint rotations, stretches, rubbing and palming. tonification is the attraction of the mobilised Ki by using pressure on the meridians and points (tsubos), with this pressure being applied using the thumbs, fingers, elbows and the knees.  Shiatsu therapy is usually given at floor level on a futon. Unlike some other forms of body therapy, Shiatsu is carried out with the client fully clothed and without the application of oils, etc.

Shiatsu for health and wellbeing

Shiatsu for health and wellbeing

Shiatsu (pronounced shee-at-soo) is a Japanese word meaning finger pressure and is the name created early in the 20th century for this gentle, efficient, healing technique. The Japanese Government recognised Shiatsu as a valuable part of their health system over 60 years ago.  Here, in the West, we have only recently started to appreciate Shiatsu and it has now been recognised by the European Parliament and included in the European Register of Non-Conventional Medical Disciplines.

Shiatsu has some of its origins in Traditional Chinese Medicine and it is a blend of Chinese acupuncture and the Japanese system of Anma (massage).  It is sometimes referred to as “Acupressure” but this is an inaccurate description as Shiatsu has so much more to offer. The practitioner may use fingers, thumbs, elbows and even knees to apply pressure on the tsubos (acupuncture points) as well as incorporating gentle stretches and manipulations.

These stretches, combined with the use of the tsubos, has the effect of stimulating the circulatory system and the lymphatic system, it works on both divisions of the autonomic nervous system, helps to release tension in the muscles, and can also stimulate the hormonal system. Shiatsu usually leaves a feeling of well-being and calmness, of being more in touch with one’s body and self.
Findings from the European Shiatsu Federation research study carried out by Professor Andrew Long at the University of Leeds.

 

The Experience and Effects of Shiatsu: A Cross-European Study.

  • 89% of Shiatsu receivers felt calmer and more relaxed.
  • Up to 60% of regular shiatsu receivers slept better.
  • Receivers rated their symptoms as significantly reduced throughout the 6 month study.
  • 86% said that shiatsu was effective in treating stress and tension, structural and postural problems, low energy and fatigue.
  • Overall, Shiatsu receivers adopted a more relaxed, healthier and balanced approach to life.
  • Reduced use of conventional medicine.